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Environmental impact statements: new legal technique for environmental protection

Journal Article:

Abstract

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) has required Federal agencies to re-examine all their programs affecting the environment, to consider alternative policies, to coordinate their actions with other agencies, and to disclose their environmental analyses to the public. In short, it has attempted to change decision processes markedly, in order to respond to wide-spread public concern about a deteriorating natural and human environment. The mandates of the policy are listed, but knowing that these were not sufficient to change existing agency practices, Congress established what has been called an ''action-forcing mechanism.'' Each federal agency must ''include in every recommendation or report on proposals for legislation and other major federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, a detailed statement by the responsible official.'' This statement must cover the following five points as specified in Section 102(2)(c): the environmental impact of the proposed action; any adverse environmental effects which cannot be avoided should the proposal be implemented; alternatives to the proposed action; the relationship between local and short-term uses of man's environment and the maintenance and enhancement of long-term productivity, and any irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources which would be involved in the proposed action should it be  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Feb 01, 1975
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EPA-; EDB-76-074447
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Earth Law J.; (Netherlands); Journal Volume: 1:1
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; AIR POLLUTION; REGULATIONS; ENVIRONMENT; LAWS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENTS; LAND POLLUTION; POLLUTION LAWS; USA; WATER POLLUTION; LEGAL ASPECTS; DOCUMENT TYPES; NORTH AMERICA; POLLUTION; 290300* - Energy Planning & Policy- Environment, Health, & Safety; 293000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Policy, Legislation, & Regulation; 500600 - Environment, Atmospheric- Regulations- (-1989); 510600 - Environment, Terrestrial- Regulations- (-1989); 520600 - Environment, Aquatic- Regulations - (-1989)
OSTI ID:
7359432
Country of Origin:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ELAJD
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 15-28
Announcement Date:
Oct 01, 1976

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Baldwin, M F. Environmental impact statements: new legal technique for environmental protection. Netherlands: N. p., 1975. Web.
Baldwin, M F. Environmental impact statements: new legal technique for environmental protection. Netherlands.
Baldwin, M F. 1975. "Environmental impact statements: new legal technique for environmental protection." Netherlands.
@misc{etde_7359432,
title = {Environmental impact statements: new legal technique for environmental protection}
author = {Baldwin, M F}
abstractNote = {The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) has required Federal agencies to re-examine all their programs affecting the environment, to consider alternative policies, to coordinate their actions with other agencies, and to disclose their environmental analyses to the public. In short, it has attempted to change decision processes markedly, in order to respond to wide-spread public concern about a deteriorating natural and human environment. The mandates of the policy are listed, but knowing that these were not sufficient to change existing agency practices, Congress established what has been called an ''action-forcing mechanism.'' Each federal agency must ''include in every recommendation or report on proposals for legislation and other major federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, a detailed statement by the responsible official.'' This statement must cover the following five points as specified in Section 102(2)(c): the environmental impact of the proposed action; any adverse environmental effects which cannot be avoided should the proposal be implemented; alternatives to the proposed action; the relationship between local and short-term uses of man's environment and the maintenance and enhancement of long-term productivity, and any irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources which would be involved in the proposed action should it be implemented. Section 102 has been considered the heart of the National Environmental Policy Act. The specific five-point environmental report--known as an environmental impact statement--is the visible evidence of an agency's compliance with the environmental policy articulated by Congress. (MCW)}
journal = {Earth Law J.; (Netherlands)}
volume = {1:1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Netherlands}
year = {1975}
month = {Feb}
}