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World wide developments in shortwall and wide web mining techniques

Journal Article:

Abstract

The paper describes the progress to date with continuous pillar extraction, and how the typical longwall powered support has been modified to be both strong enough and stable enough to provide roof support for very wide webs. It also describes the operating systems which have been specially designed. The next stages of development are discussed, particularly the provision of continuous conveyor haulage in place of the present-day shuttle car. The author suggests that marrying American coal-getting technology and British roof support technology might increase productivity.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Nov 01, 1975
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-76-063092
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Min. Eng. (London); (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 135:177
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COAL MINES; ENGINEERING; COAL; COAL MINING; MINING EQUIPMENT; ROOFS; SUPPORTS; TRANSPORT; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; ENERGY SOURCES; EQUIPMENT; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; MECHANICAL STRUCTURES; MINES; MINING; 012000* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Mining
OSTI ID:
7348479
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: MNEGA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 87-97
Announcement Date:
Sep 01, 1976

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Pollard, T. World wide developments in shortwall and wide web mining techniques. United Kingdom: N. p., 1975. Web.
Pollard, T. World wide developments in shortwall and wide web mining techniques. United Kingdom.
Pollard, T. 1975. "World wide developments in shortwall and wide web mining techniques." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_7348479,
title = {World wide developments in shortwall and wide web mining techniques}
author = {Pollard, T}
abstractNote = {The paper describes the progress to date with continuous pillar extraction, and how the typical longwall powered support has been modified to be both strong enough and stable enough to provide roof support for very wide webs. It also describes the operating systems which have been specially designed. The next stages of development are discussed, particularly the provision of continuous conveyor haulage in place of the present-day shuttle car. The author suggests that marrying American coal-getting technology and British roof support technology might increase productivity.}
journal = {Min. Eng. (London); (United Kingdom)}
volume = {135:177}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1975}
month = {Nov}
}