You need JavaScript to view this

Energy costs and society: the high price of future energy

Abstract

Society will not be able to afford nonfossil fuel energy in the future without a major restructuring of industrial activity, involving a complete rethinking of the basis of our present social and economic establishment. This restructuring must be combined with the evident necessity of policies of population restriction and controls in the form of international allocation of the dwindling supply of raw materials, including fossil (and, in future, nonfossil) primary energy. Only by such means, and by adopting a very low-growth future, can some moderate degree of standard of living be expected to be perpetuated for at least a few generations in the industrialized countries, especially in the case of those that are major energy importers at present. This type of future will also be of more help to the third world than one involving the now impossible ideal of a spiraling energy growth rate. The society which, on an optimistic view, will emerge toward the end of the fossil fuel era, will be supplied with abundant, though efficiently applied, energy, and will survive with natural products and by economizing its recylced mineral resources. The approach to this goal will require political leadership, serious education of the public, and a  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jun 01, 1976
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EPA-; EDB-76-064565
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Policy; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 4:2
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ENERGY; SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS; ENERGY CONSERVATION; ENERGY SOURCES; ALLOCATIONS; FORECASTING; POPULATION DENSITY; COAL; COST; ECONOMICS; EDUCATION; ENERGY SUPPLIES; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; MINERALS; NUCLEAR FUELS; RECYCLING; SOCIOLOGY; SYNTHETIC FUELS; THERMONUCLEAR FUELS; USA; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; NORTH AMERICA; REACTOR MATERIALS; 290200* - Energy Planning & Policy- Economics & Sociology; 292000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Supply, Demand & Forecasting; 530100 - Environmental-Social Aspects of Energy Technologies- Social & Economic Studies- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
7348262
Research Organizations:
Centre Nationale pour Recherche Scientifique, Bellevue, France
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ENPYA
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
Pages: 87-97
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Appleby, A J. Energy costs and society: the high price of future energy. United Kingdom: N. p., 1976. Web. doi:10.1016/0301-4215(76)90002-1.
Appleby, A J. Energy costs and society: the high price of future energy. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0301-4215(76)90002-1.
Appleby, A J. 1976. "Energy costs and society: the high price of future energy." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0301-4215(76)90002-1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0301-4215(76)90002-1.
@misc{etde_7348262,
title = {Energy costs and society: the high price of future energy}
author = {Appleby, A J}
abstractNote = {Society will not be able to afford nonfossil fuel energy in the future without a major restructuring of industrial activity, involving a complete rethinking of the basis of our present social and economic establishment. This restructuring must be combined with the evident necessity of policies of population restriction and controls in the form of international allocation of the dwindling supply of raw materials, including fossil (and, in future, nonfossil) primary energy. Only by such means, and by adopting a very low-growth future, can some moderate degree of standard of living be expected to be perpetuated for at least a few generations in the industrialized countries, especially in the case of those that are major energy importers at present. This type of future will also be of more help to the third world than one involving the now impossible ideal of a spiraling energy growth rate. The society which, on an optimistic view, will emerge toward the end of the fossil fuel era, will be supplied with abundant, though efficiently applied, energy, and will survive with natural products and by economizing its recylced mineral resources. The approach to this goal will require political leadership, serious education of the public, and a real population policy, all on a world-wide scale. (Conclusions)}
doi = {10.1016/0301-4215(76)90002-1}
journal = {Energy Policy; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {4:2}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1976}
month = {Jun}
}