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Opposition to nuclear power: a review of international experience

Abstract

This paper examines the rise of opposition to nuclear power in the USA, the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Sweden, and Japan. It explores the course that opposition has taken, the issues on which it has focused, the factors that have influenced it, and the problems it poses for public decision making. Opinions differ about the causes of nuclear opposition. Indeed, it is probable that a variety of factors have contributed, including cultural and political values regarding continued economic and energy growth and fears of deliberate large-scale violence with the spread of radioactive materials, the protest movements against nuclear weapons testing, the upsurge in environmental concern in the 1960s, the movement towards greater social responsibility in science, and a growing distrust of ''the Establishment''--particularly in the USA because of Watergate. The upsurge in concern was reflected in greater attention to environmental matters in the mass media, schools, universities, and the international agencies. It is important to recognize that this concern cuts across conventional left-right divisions of politics. Radicals, communists, and conservatives can be found among both the proponents and the critics. These difficulties facing the policy maker are accentuated by the amorphous nature both of the opposition and the issues  More>>
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1976
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EPA-; EDB-77-036095
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Policy; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 4:4
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; FRANCE; NUCLEAR POWER; GERMAN FEDERAL REPUBLIC; JAPAN; PUBLIC RELATIONS; SWEDEN; USA; ENERGY POLICY; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; ASIA; EUROPE; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; NORTH AMERICA; POWER; SCANDINAVIA; WEAPONS; 290600* - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy
OSTI ID:
7325204
Research Organizations:
Univ. of Sussex, Brighton, Eng.
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ENPYA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 286-307
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Surrey, J, and Huggett, C. Opposition to nuclear power: a review of international experience. United Kingdom: N. p., 1976. Web. doi:10.1016/0301-4215(76)90023-9.
Surrey, J, & Huggett, C. Opposition to nuclear power: a review of international experience. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0301-4215(76)90023-9.
Surrey, J, and Huggett, C. 1976. "Opposition to nuclear power: a review of international experience." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0301-4215(76)90023-9. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0301-4215(76)90023-9.
@misc{etde_7325204,
title = {Opposition to nuclear power: a review of international experience}
author = {Surrey, J, and Huggett, C}
abstractNote = {This paper examines the rise of opposition to nuclear power in the USA, the Federal Republic of Germany, France, Sweden, and Japan. It explores the course that opposition has taken, the issues on which it has focused, the factors that have influenced it, and the problems it poses for public decision making. Opinions differ about the causes of nuclear opposition. Indeed, it is probable that a variety of factors have contributed, including cultural and political values regarding continued economic and energy growth and fears of deliberate large-scale violence with the spread of radioactive materials, the protest movements against nuclear weapons testing, the upsurge in environmental concern in the 1960s, the movement towards greater social responsibility in science, and a growing distrust of ''the Establishment''--particularly in the USA because of Watergate. The upsurge in concern was reflected in greater attention to environmental matters in the mass media, schools, universities, and the international agencies. It is important to recognize that this concern cuts across conventional left-right divisions of politics. Radicals, communists, and conservatives can be found among both the proponents and the critics. These difficulties facing the policy maker are accentuated by the amorphous nature both of the opposition and the issues which have received attention and by the evidence of many opinion surveys: that more people are in favor of nuclear power than oppose it, but the majority are uncertain and do not understand the issues. For purposes of analysis it is useful to distinguish between three types of opposition--nuclear-specific, site-specific, and that related to planning and consent procedures. (MCW)}
doi = {10.1016/0301-4215(76)90023-9}
journal = {Energy Policy; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {4:4}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1976}
month = {Dec}
}