You need JavaScript to view this

Potential of natural energy sources

Abstract

Apart from fossil fuels and nuclear energy, five main alternative sources of power for electricity generation are: the sun, the wind, the waves, the tides, and the heat inside the earth. Each has been examined for its relevance to the energy situation in Britain and in particular to the CEGB's requirements as an electrical utility. None emerges from the analysis as directly competitive with nuclear power, provided that nuclear fulfills present expectations. As an insurance against unforeseen delays in the nuclear program, however, one or two of the options may well be worth closer consideration, particularly wave power, for which Britain is favorably placed. The best immediate prospect for using solar energy falls outside the province of the CEGB, in the area of domestic water heating. Wind power, despite the windiness of the British Isles, suffers in practice from a low load factor, which would greatly inflate the capital cost. Geothermal power in Britain, geologically one of the most stable parts of the world, appears to be available only at depths too great to be presently attractive for electricity generation. Finally, tidal power, although technically available in limited amounts, again suffers from high capital costs. (auth)
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1976
Product Type:
Book
Reference Number:
ERA-02-020316; EPA-; EDB-77-036217
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Reprinted from CEGB Research No. 2; Related Information: NP-21385
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; 17 WIND ENERGY; 16 TIDAL AND WAVE POWER; 21 SPECIFIC NUCLEAR REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; FEASIBILITY STUDIES; NUCLEAR POWER; FORECASTING; SOLAR ENERGY; TIDAL POWER; UNITED KINGDOM; ENERGY; WAVE POWER; WIND POWER; BIOMASS; CAPITAL; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; ECONOMICS; FOSSIL FUELS; INSURANCE; INVESTMENT; PLANNING; POWER GENERATION; SOLAR WATER HEATERS; APPLIANCES; ELECTRIC APPLIANCES; ENERGY SOURCES; EUROPE; FUELS; GAS APPLIANCES; HEATERS; POWER; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; WATER HEATERS; 296000* - Energy Planning & Policy- Electric Power; 140000 - Solar Energy; 170000 - Wind Energy; 160000 - Tidal & Wave Power; 210000 - Nuclear Power Plants
OSTI ID:
7325153
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Availability:
CEGB, Press and Publicity Office, Sudbury House, 15 Newgate St., London EC1A 7AU.
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 13
Announcement Date:
May 13, 2001

Citation Formats

Denton, J D, Glanville, R, Gliddon, B J, Harrison, P L, Hotchkiss, R C, Hughes, E M, Swift-Hook, D T, and Wright, J K. Potential of natural energy sources. United Kingdom: N. p., 1976. Web.
Denton, J D, Glanville, R, Gliddon, B J, Harrison, P L, Hotchkiss, R C, Hughes, E M, Swift-Hook, D T, & Wright, J K. Potential of natural energy sources. United Kingdom.
Denton, J D, Glanville, R, Gliddon, B J, Harrison, P L, Hotchkiss, R C, Hughes, E M, Swift-Hook, D T, and Wright, J K. 1976. "Potential of natural energy sources." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_7325153,
title = {Potential of natural energy sources}
author = {Denton, J D, Glanville, R, Gliddon, B J, Harrison, P L, Hotchkiss, R C, Hughes, E M, Swift-Hook, D T, and Wright, J K}
abstractNote = {Apart from fossil fuels and nuclear energy, five main alternative sources of power for electricity generation are: the sun, the wind, the waves, the tides, and the heat inside the earth. Each has been examined for its relevance to the energy situation in Britain and in particular to the CEGB's requirements as an electrical utility. None emerges from the analysis as directly competitive with nuclear power, provided that nuclear fulfills present expectations. As an insurance against unforeseen delays in the nuclear program, however, one or two of the options may well be worth closer consideration, particularly wave power, for which Britain is favorably placed. The best immediate prospect for using solar energy falls outside the province of the CEGB, in the area of domestic water heating. Wind power, despite the windiness of the British Isles, suffers in practice from a low load factor, which would greatly inflate the capital cost. Geothermal power in Britain, geologically one of the most stable parts of the world, appears to be available only at depths too great to be presently attractive for electricity generation. Finally, tidal power, although technically available in limited amounts, again suffers from high capital costs. (auth)}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1976}
month = {Jan}
}