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Sensitivity of TDF and CRE to variations in exponents of N and T

Journal Article:

Abstract

A typical example is given of the calculation by two methods of the value of the radiation dose given in 20 treatments at 5 fractions per week to be equivalent to 6000 rad given in 30 treatments also at 5 fractions per week. The solutions obtained were identical and demonstrated that, in normal clinical practice, whatever values are chosen for the exponents of N and T in the basic NSD equation, the CRE (Kirk, J., Gray, W.M., and Watson, E.R., 1971, Clinical Radiology, vol. 22, 145) and TDF (Orton, C.G., and Ellis, F., 1973, Br. J. Radiol., vol. 46, 529) methods are exactly equivalent. The variations in the values calculated by the TDF method of the dose/fraction in the same example for differing values of the exponents of N and T were typically less than +- 3%, and even for more drastic changes a variation of less than 5% resulted. The TDF and CRE methods are not therefore very sensitive to changes in these exponents. It is emphasized that since CREs are not linearly additive, application of the TDF method greatly reduces the probability of arithmetical error, particularly for more complex treatment regimes. The TDF method should however be applied  More>>
Authors:
Orton, C G [1] 
  1. Rhode Island Hospital, Providence (USA). Dept. of Radiation Oncology
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1976
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
AIX-08-287089; EDB-77-070461
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Br. J. Radiol.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 49:586
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; RADIOTHERAPY; TEMPORAL DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CUMULATIVE RADIATION EFFECTS; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; FRACTIONATED IRRADIATION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; RADIATION DOSES; DOSES; IRRADIATION; MEDICINE; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; RADIATION DOSE DISTRIBUTIONS; RADIOLOGY; THERAPY; 560151* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Man
OSTI ID:
7312549
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: BJRAA
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
Pages: 897-898
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Orton, C G. Sensitivity of TDF and CRE to variations in exponents of N and T. United Kingdom: N. p., 1976. Web.
Orton, C G. Sensitivity of TDF and CRE to variations in exponents of N and T. United Kingdom.
Orton, C G. 1976. "Sensitivity of TDF and CRE to variations in exponents of N and T." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_7312549,
title = {Sensitivity of TDF and CRE to variations in exponents of N and T}
author = {Orton, C G}
abstractNote = {A typical example is given of the calculation by two methods of the value of the radiation dose given in 20 treatments at 5 fractions per week to be equivalent to 6000 rad given in 30 treatments also at 5 fractions per week. The solutions obtained were identical and demonstrated that, in normal clinical practice, whatever values are chosen for the exponents of N and T in the basic NSD equation, the CRE (Kirk, J., Gray, W.M., and Watson, E.R., 1971, Clinical Radiology, vol. 22, 145) and TDF (Orton, C.G., and Ellis, F., 1973, Br. J. Radiol., vol. 46, 529) methods are exactly equivalent. The variations in the values calculated by the TDF method of the dose/fraction in the same example for differing values of the exponents of N and T were typically less than +- 3%, and even for more drastic changes a variation of less than 5% resulted. The TDF and CRE methods are not therefore very sensitive to changes in these exponents. It is emphasized that since CREs are not linearly additive, application of the TDF method greatly reduces the probability of arithmetical error, particularly for more complex treatment regimes. The TDF method should however be applied with great caution if the time, dose or fractionation differ significantly from that used in conventional radiotherapeutic practice, since the theory was based on clinical evidence obtained by retrospective analysis of typical radiotherapy data.}
journal = {Br. J. Radiol.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {49:586}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1976}
month = {Oct}
}