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Origin of oil shale

Journal Article:

Abstract

Kerogen was believed to be formed by the inspissation of petroleum. During this process nitrogen and sulfur compounds were concentrated in the most inspissated or weathered products. At a certain stage, reached gradually, the organic matter became insoluble in carbon-disulfide and ceased to be a bitumen. Oil shale was formed by the power of certain clays or shales to absorb inspissated petroleum, particularly unsaturated hydrocarbons. This adsorption apparently depended on the colloid content of the argillaceous rock. This rock retained these impregnated petroleum residues long after porous sandstones in the vicinity had lost all traces of petroleum by weathering and leaching.
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1915
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-77-144260
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proc. R. Soc. Edinburgh; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 36
Subject:
04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; OIL SHALES; ORIGIN; CLAYS; EVAPORATION; KEROGEN; LEACHING; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; PETROLEUM; SEDIMENTARY ROCKS; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; WEATHERING; BITUMINOUS MATERIALS; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; DISSOLUTION; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; MINERALS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; ROCKS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; 040201* - Oil Shales & Tar Sands- Site Geology- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
7300939
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: PRSEA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 44-86
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Cunningham-Craig, E H. Origin of oil shale. United Kingdom: N. p., 1915. Web.
Cunningham-Craig, E H. Origin of oil shale. United Kingdom.
Cunningham-Craig, E H. 1915. "Origin of oil shale." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_7300939,
title = {Origin of oil shale}
author = {Cunningham-Craig, E H}
abstractNote = {Kerogen was believed to be formed by the inspissation of petroleum. During this process nitrogen and sulfur compounds were concentrated in the most inspissated or weathered products. At a certain stage, reached gradually, the organic matter became insoluble in carbon-disulfide and ceased to be a bitumen. Oil shale was formed by the power of certain clays or shales to absorb inspissated petroleum, particularly unsaturated hydrocarbons. This adsorption apparently depended on the colloid content of the argillaceous rock. This rock retained these impregnated petroleum residues long after porous sandstones in the vicinity had lost all traces of petroleum by weathering and leaching.}
journal = {Proc. R. Soc. Edinburgh; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {36}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1915}
month = {Jan}
}