You need JavaScript to view this

Water hardness and cardiovascular disease. Elements in water and human tissues

Abstract

The hypothesis that the hardness of drinking water has a causal role in the development of cardiovascular disease will be strengthened if it can be demonstrated that elements in drinking water find their way into human tissues in significant amounts. For biologically important metals, the evidence is reviewed for a relationship of tissue levels to levels in drinking water. Hard water can contribute significantly to daily magnesium intake. Residents of hard-water areas may have raised levels of magnesium in coronary arteries, bone, and myocardial tissue. Lead levels in bone and in blood have been shown to be elevated in individuals living in homes with lead plumbing and soft water. Cadmium intake from water is probably small compared to that from other sources, and there is no convincing evidence of alteration in human tissue levels via drinking water cadmium. Human zinc and copper tissue levels are of interest but have not been adequately studied in relation to drinking water levels.
Authors:
Publication Date:
May 01, 1977
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
ERA-03-007599; EDB-78-006122
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Sci. Total Environ.; (Netherlands); Journal Volume: 7:3
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES; DRINKING WATER; HEALTH HAZARDS; METALS; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; ARTERIES; BLOOD; BONE TISSUES; CADMIUM; COPPER; HARDNESS; HEART; HYPOTHESIS; LEAD; MAGNESIUM; MAN; TISSUES; ZINC; ALKALINE EARTH METALS; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD VESSELS; BODY; BODY FLUIDS; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; DISEASES; ELEMENTS; HAZARDS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; MAMMALS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; ORGANS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PRIMATES; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; VERTEBRATES; WATER; 560306* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987); 550500 - Metabolism
OSTI ID:
7285040
Research Organizations:
National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD
Country of Origin:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: STEVA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 217-226
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Sharrett, A R. Water hardness and cardiovascular disease. Elements in water and human tissues. Netherlands: N. p., 1977. Web. doi:10.1016/0048-9697(77)90045-6.
Sharrett, A R. Water hardness and cardiovascular disease. Elements in water and human tissues. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/0048-9697(77)90045-6.
Sharrett, A R. 1977. "Water hardness and cardiovascular disease. Elements in water and human tissues." Netherlands. doi:10.1016/0048-9697(77)90045-6. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0048-9697(77)90045-6.
@misc{etde_7285040,
title = {Water hardness and cardiovascular disease. Elements in water and human tissues}
author = {Sharrett, A R}
abstractNote = {The hypothesis that the hardness of drinking water has a causal role in the development of cardiovascular disease will be strengthened if it can be demonstrated that elements in drinking water find their way into human tissues in significant amounts. For biologically important metals, the evidence is reviewed for a relationship of tissue levels to levels in drinking water. Hard water can contribute significantly to daily magnesium intake. Residents of hard-water areas may have raised levels of magnesium in coronary arteries, bone, and myocardial tissue. Lead levels in bone and in blood have been shown to be elevated in individuals living in homes with lead plumbing and soft water. Cadmium intake from water is probably small compared to that from other sources, and there is no convincing evidence of alteration in human tissue levels via drinking water cadmium. Human zinc and copper tissue levels are of interest but have not been adequately studied in relation to drinking water levels.}
doi = {10.1016/0048-9697(77)90045-6}
journal = {Sci. Total Environ.; (Netherlands)}
volume = {7:3}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Netherlands}
year = {1977}
month = {May}
}