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Nuclear fuel

Journal Article:

Abstract

It is expected that nuclear power generation will reach 49 million kW in 1985 and 129 million kW in 1995, and the nuclear fuel having to be supplied and processed will increase in proportion to these values. The technical problems concerning nuclear fuel are presented on the basis of the balance between the benefit for human beings and the burden on the human beings. Recently, especially the downstream of nuclear fuel attracts public attention. Enriched uranium as the raw material for light water reactor fuel is almost monopolized by the U.S., and the technical information has not been published for fear of the diversion to nuclear weapons. In this paper, the present situations of uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, transportation, reprocessing and waste disposal and the future problems are described according to the path of nuclear fuel cycle. The demand and supply of enriched uranium in Japan will be balanced up to about 1988, but afterwards, the supply must rely upon the early establishment of the domestic technology by centrifugal separation method. No problem remains in the fabrication of light water reactor fuel, but for the fabrication of mixed oxide fuel, the mechanization of the production facility and labor saving are  More>>
Authors:
Nakano, H [1] 
  1. Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokyo (Japan)
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1976
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
AIX-08-340750; ERA-03-009772; EDB-78-013805
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Karyoku Genshiryoku Hatsuden; (Japan); Journal Volume: 27:10
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; NUCLEAR FUELS; AVAILABILITY; DEMAND FACTORS; CASKS; ENRICHED URANIUM; FABRICATION; FUEL CYCLE; FUEL ELEMENTS; GAS CENTRIFUGATION; ISOTOPE SEPARATION; ISOTOPE SEPARATION PLANTS; JAPAN; PLUTONIUM; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; RADIOACTIVE WASTE PROCESSING; REPROCESSING; SPECIFICATIONS; TRANSPORT; TRANSPORT REGULATIONS; ACTINIDES; ASIA; CENTRIFUGATION; CONTAINERS; ELEMENTS; ENERGY SOURCES; FUELS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; ISOTOPE ENRICHED MATERIALS; MANAGEMENT; METALS; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; PROCESSING; REACTOR COMPONENTS; REACTOR MATERIALS; REGULATIONS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; TRANSURANIUM ELEMENTS; URANIUM; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE PROCESSING; 051000* - Nuclear Fuels- Economic, Industrial, & Business Aspects
OSTI ID:
7280347
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
Japanese
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: KGHTA
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
Pages: 1017-1031
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Nakano, H. Nuclear fuel. Japan: N. p., 1976. Web.
Nakano, H. Nuclear fuel. Japan.
Nakano, H. 1976. "Nuclear fuel." Japan.
@misc{etde_7280347,
title = {Nuclear fuel}
author = {Nakano, H}
abstractNote = {It is expected that nuclear power generation will reach 49 million kW in 1985 and 129 million kW in 1995, and the nuclear fuel having to be supplied and processed will increase in proportion to these values. The technical problems concerning nuclear fuel are presented on the basis of the balance between the benefit for human beings and the burden on the human beings. Recently, especially the downstream of nuclear fuel attracts public attention. Enriched uranium as the raw material for light water reactor fuel is almost monopolized by the U.S., and the technical information has not been published for fear of the diversion to nuclear weapons. In this paper, the present situations of uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, transportation, reprocessing and waste disposal and the future problems are described according to the path of nuclear fuel cycle. The demand and supply of enriched uranium in Japan will be balanced up to about 1988, but afterwards, the supply must rely upon the early establishment of the domestic technology by centrifugal separation method. No problem remains in the fabrication of light water reactor fuel, but for the fabrication of mixed oxide fuel, the mechanization of the production facility and labor saving are necessary. The solution of the capital risk for the construction of the second reprocessing plant is the main problem. Japan must develop waste disposal techniques with all-out efforts.}
journal = {Karyoku Genshiryoku Hatsuden; (Japan)}
volume = {27:10}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Japan}
year = {1976}
month = {Oct}
}