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Relation of peat to oil shale

Journal Article:

Abstract

Samples of oil shale from the Green River formation and from Elko (Nev.), Brazil, Austria, and South Africa were examined, and several varieties of shale were found. Green River oil shale represents three of the more common types plus one less common type. These were: contorted shale with a velvety appearance, thin paper shale resembling the curled-up leaves of a book, massive black shale resembling a piece of rubber, and a less common type, which showed the bedding planes very clearly. The Elko (Nev.) shale was a light buff color; the shale from Brazil resembled a piece of petrified peat. When the shales were cut very thin, their colors ranged from yellow to reddish-brown. The composition, as seen under the microscope, was of well-preserved plant material such as spores, pollen grains, fragments of cell tissues, algae, fungi, bacteria, macerated organic residue, small pieces of resin, animal fossils, and translucent bodies. Oil shale was produced from organic material that accumulated in peat bogs, marshes, or swamps in fresh or salt waters. The organic matter was decomposed by bacterial action. Certain parts of the plants decayed more readily than others. Before lithification occurred, a chemical action took place that changed the softer  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1924
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-77-117722
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Chem. Age (London); (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 32
Subject:
04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; OIL SHALES; GEOCHEMISTRY; ANIMALS; AUSTRIA; BRAZIL; DECOMPOSITION; GREEN RIVER FORMATION; HUMIC ACIDS; KEROGEN; LITHOLOGY; NEVADA; OPTICAL MICROSCOPY; PEAT; PETROLOGY; PLANTS; SOUTH AFRICA; AFRICA; BIOMASS; BITUMINOUS MATERIALS; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHEMISTRY; ENERGY SOURCES; EUROPE; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GEOLOGY; LATIN AMERICA; MICROSCOPY; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; SOUTH AMERICA; USA; WESTERN REGION; 040201* - Oil Shales & Tar Sands- Site Geology- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
7253886
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: CHAGA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 63-64
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Linker, S. Relation of peat to oil shale. United Kingdom: N. p., 1924. Web.
Linker, S. Relation of peat to oil shale. United Kingdom.
Linker, S. 1924. "Relation of peat to oil shale." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_7253886,
title = {Relation of peat to oil shale}
author = {Linker, S}
abstractNote = {Samples of oil shale from the Green River formation and from Elko (Nev.), Brazil, Austria, and South Africa were examined, and several varieties of shale were found. Green River oil shale represents three of the more common types plus one less common type. These were: contorted shale with a velvety appearance, thin paper shale resembling the curled-up leaves of a book, massive black shale resembling a piece of rubber, and a less common type, which showed the bedding planes very clearly. The Elko (Nev.) shale was a light buff color; the shale from Brazil resembled a piece of petrified peat. When the shales were cut very thin, their colors ranged from yellow to reddish-brown. The composition, as seen under the microscope, was of well-preserved plant material such as spores, pollen grains, fragments of cell tissues, algae, fungi, bacteria, macerated organic residue, small pieces of resin, animal fossils, and translucent bodies. Oil shale was produced from organic material that accumulated in peat bogs, marshes, or swamps in fresh or salt waters. The organic matter was decomposed by bacterial action. Certain parts of the plants decayed more readily than others. Before lithification occurred, a chemical action took place that changed the softer tissues of the plant debris into a gel. This collodial matter penetrated and surrounded the more resistant fragments and preserved them from further decay. Certain bog waters contain a high percentage of humic acids in solution or collodial suspension and produce insoluble humates when neutralized. These humates are probably the so-called kerogen bodies.}
journal = {Chem. Age (London); (United Kingdom)}
volume = {32}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1924}
month = {Jan}
}