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Paper recycling and social policy. [United Kingdom]

Abstract

The most promising new source of paper for recycling is the household and small commercial business, whose waste papers can be processed if the paper and board industry is willing to invest capital to develop the facilities and the technology needed to upgrade indigenous fibers. Cost-benefit analyses in the United Kingdom indicate that support of this type of paper recycling has more merit than a buffer stock scheme. Efforts to conserve virgin materials by increasing the use of secondary materials could be further strengthened by taxes on the disposal of virgin materials. Paper recycling policies should include a range of sources, from discarded post-consumer waste paper and boxes to the release and use of energy by incineration, pyrolysis, and hydrolysis. Waste availability is influenced by product durability, replacement by other products (such as plastic wrap for paper), industry maturity, and social attitudes. Public acceptance of lower-quality paper products and improved technology to remove ink and color should combine to make recycling more feasible. Efforts to develop the household and commercial sector will result in lower import requirements for wood pulp and an improved balance of payments for the United Kingdom. Recycled fibers require less water and energy to process, but  More>>
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1976
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EPA-; ERA-02-026851; EDB-77-054967
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Resour. Policy; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 2:4
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; PAPER; RECYCLING; SOLID WASTES; UNITED KINGDOM; WASTE PROCESSING; CAPITAL; COMMERCIAL SECTOR; COST; COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS; EFFICIENCY; ENERGY CONSUMPTION; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; FINANCING; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; PRODUCTION; PUBLIC RELATIONS; RESIDENTIAL SECTOR; EUROPE; MANAGEMENT; PROCESSING; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES; 299003* - Energy Planning & Policy- Unconventional Sources & Power Generation- Other- (-1989); 293000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Policy, Legislation, & Regulation; 530200 - Environmental-Social Aspects of Energy Technologies- Assessment of Energy Technologies- (-1989); 090400 - Solid Waste & Wood Fuels- (-1989); 320604 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Municipalities & Community Systems- Municipal Waste Management- (1980-)
OSTI ID:
7231081
Research Organizations:
Univ. of Leicester, Eng.
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: RSPCA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 256-266
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Turner, R K, and Grace, R. Paper recycling and social policy. [United Kingdom]. United Kingdom: N. p., 1976. Web. doi:10.1016/0301-4207(76)90080-5.
Turner, R K, & Grace, R. Paper recycling and social policy. [United Kingdom]. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0301-4207(76)90080-5.
Turner, R K, and Grace, R. 1976. "Paper recycling and social policy. [United Kingdom]." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0301-4207(76)90080-5. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0301-4207(76)90080-5.
@misc{etde_7231081,
title = {Paper recycling and social policy. [United Kingdom]}
author = {Turner, R K, and Grace, R}
abstractNote = {The most promising new source of paper for recycling is the household and small commercial business, whose waste papers can be processed if the paper and board industry is willing to invest capital to develop the facilities and the technology needed to upgrade indigenous fibers. Cost-benefit analyses in the United Kingdom indicate that support of this type of paper recycling has more merit than a buffer stock scheme. Efforts to conserve virgin materials by increasing the use of secondary materials could be further strengthened by taxes on the disposal of virgin materials. Paper recycling policies should include a range of sources, from discarded post-consumer waste paper and boxes to the release and use of energy by incineration, pyrolysis, and hydrolysis. Waste availability is influenced by product durability, replacement by other products (such as plastic wrap for paper), industry maturity, and social attitudes. Public acceptance of lower-quality paper products and improved technology to remove ink and color should combine to make recycling more feasible. Efforts to develop the household and commercial sector will result in lower import requirements for wood pulp and an improved balance of payments for the United Kingdom. Recycled fibers require less water and energy to process, but the process wastes introduce environmental pollutants. Short- and long-term forecasts show a growth rate trend that varies with paper grade and corresponds with general economic growth. (35 references) (DCK)}
doi = {10.1016/0301-4207(76)90080-5}
journal = {Resour. Policy; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {2:4}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1976}
month = {Dec}
}