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Energy carriers within Europe: electricity and SNG

Abstract

The general aim of this paper is to make a case for substitute natural gas as an energy carrier with prospects for growth that are at least as good as those of electricity and a life expectancy as long as one can reasonably plan for. The bulk of the paper analyzes the determinants of commercial competition between SNG and electricity. Space heat is treated in detail because this is generally seen as the area in which rapid expansion of electricity sales is possible. The provision of process heat to industry is dealt with superficially. The principal conclusion is that, for space heating and some industrial process heating and over a wide range of future costs for fossil and nuclear fuels, SNG from the marginal source of bulk fuel will be of lower cost than electricity from an integrated system of nuclear generating stations and fossil-fired stations using the same marginal source of fossil fuel. This conclusion may be difficult to accept because it conflicts with intuition. In Europe now there is a good case for installing more nuclear plants if what is wanted is base-load power. There are also mines producing coal at higher cost than imported oil. The short-term  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Mar 01, 1977
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
ERA-02-035396; EPA-; EDB-77-082047
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Policy; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 5:1
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 10 SYNTHETIC FUELS; ELECTRIC POWER; ECONOMICS; EUROPE; HIGH BTU GAS; SPACE HEATING; UNITED KINGDOM; ENERGY POLICY; COAL; COMMERCIAL SECTOR; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; PROCESS HEAT; RECOMMENDATIONS; SERVICE LIFE; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; ENERGY; ENERGY SOURCES; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; HEAT; HEATING; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; POWER; POWER PLANTS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; 292000* - Energy Planning & Policy- Supply, Demand & Forecasting; 296000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Electric Power; 295000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Hydrogen & Synthetic Fuels; 090110 - Hydrocarbon Fuels- Properties- (1979-1989)
OSTI ID:
7223389
Research Organizations:
Imperial Coll. of Science and Tech., London
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ENPYA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 25-34
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Lucas, N J.D. Energy carriers within Europe: electricity and SNG. United Kingdom: N. p., 1977. Web. doi:10.1016/0301-4215(77)90057-X.
Lucas, N J.D. Energy carriers within Europe: electricity and SNG. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0301-4215(77)90057-X.
Lucas, N J.D. 1977. "Energy carriers within Europe: electricity and SNG." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0301-4215(77)90057-X. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0301-4215(77)90057-X.
@misc{etde_7223389,
title = {Energy carriers within Europe: electricity and SNG}
author = {Lucas, N J.D.}
abstractNote = {The general aim of this paper is to make a case for substitute natural gas as an energy carrier with prospects for growth that are at least as good as those of electricity and a life expectancy as long as one can reasonably plan for. The bulk of the paper analyzes the determinants of commercial competition between SNG and electricity. Space heat is treated in detail because this is generally seen as the area in which rapid expansion of electricity sales is possible. The provision of process heat to industry is dealt with superficially. The principal conclusion is that, for space heating and some industrial process heating and over a wide range of future costs for fossil and nuclear fuels, SNG from the marginal source of bulk fuel will be of lower cost than electricity from an integrated system of nuclear generating stations and fossil-fired stations using the same marginal source of fossil fuel. This conclusion may be difficult to accept because it conflicts with intuition. In Europe now there is a good case for installing more nuclear plants if what is wanted is base-load power. There are also mines producing coal at higher cost than imported oil. The short-term economic pressure, therefore, is to install nuclear plants and retreat from coal. Moreover, natural gas from the North Sea and even LNG from distant sources is cheaper than SNG from indigenous coal is likely to be. If one believes that indigenous oil and gas will be available in large quantities, or if one believes it will be possible to import oil without difficulty or political risk, then it is right to ignore SNG as an energy carrier; but the fashionable perception of the future is that indigenous production and/or imports will be restricted by physical shortage or political constraint so that, at the margin, heat will be supplied from nuclear fuel. In these circumstances SNG appears a better carrier of energy for heat than electricity. (MCW)}
doi = {10.1016/0301-4215(77)90057-X}
journal = {Energy Policy; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {5:1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1977}
month = {Mar}
}