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Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil: Activated sludge treatability study

Abstract

Batch activated sludge treatability studies utilizing petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils (diesel oil and leaded gasoline) were conducted to determine: initial indigenous biological activity in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils; limiting factors of microbiological growth by investigating nutrient addition, chemical emulsifiers, and co-substrate; acclimation of indigenous population of microorganisms to utilize hydrocarbons as sole carbon source; and temperature effects. Soil samples were taken from three different contaminated sites and sequencing batch reactors were run. Substrate (diesel fuel) and nutrient were added as determined by laboratory analysis of orthophosphate, ammonia nitrogen, chemical oxygen demand, and total organic carbon. Substrate was made available to the bacterial mass by experimenting with four different chemical emulsifiers. Indigenous microorganisms capable of biotransforming hydrocarbons seem to be present in all the contaminated soil samples received from all sites. Microscopic analysis revealed no visible activity at the beginning of the study and presence of flagellated protozoa, paramecium, rotifers, and nematodes at the end of the year. Nutrient requirements and the limiting factors in microorganism growth were determined for each site. An emulsifier was initially necessary to make the substrate available to the microbial population. Decreases in removal were found with lowered temperature. Removal efficiencies ranged from 50-90%. 95 refs., 11 figs.,  More>>
Publication Date:
May 01, 1993
Product Type:
Book
Reference Number:
CANM-94-0E9066; EDB-94-086504
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis (M.Sc.)
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; OIL SPILLS; BIODEGRADATION; PETROLEUM; SOILS; GROWTH; MICROORGANISMS; NUTRIENTS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DECOMPOSITION; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; 020900* - Petroleum- Environmental Aspects; 540220 - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)
OSTI ID:
7206407
Research Organizations:
Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN: 0-315-85954-7
Availability:
MF Micromedia Ltd., 240 Catherine Street, Suite 305, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K2P 2G8 $15 CAN
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
Pages: (211 p)
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Rue-Van Es, J.E. La. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil: Activated sludge treatability study. Canada: N. p., 1993. Web.
Rue-Van Es, J.E. La. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil: Activated sludge treatability study. Canada.
Rue-Van Es, J.E. La. 1993. "Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil: Activated sludge treatability study." Canada.
@misc{etde_7206407,
title = {Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil: Activated sludge treatability study}
author = {Rue-Van Es, J.E. La.}
abstractNote = {Batch activated sludge treatability studies utilizing petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils (diesel oil and leaded gasoline) were conducted to determine: initial indigenous biological activity in hydrocarbon-contaminated soils; limiting factors of microbiological growth by investigating nutrient addition, chemical emulsifiers, and co-substrate; acclimation of indigenous population of microorganisms to utilize hydrocarbons as sole carbon source; and temperature effects. Soil samples were taken from three different contaminated sites and sequencing batch reactors were run. Substrate (diesel fuel) and nutrient were added as determined by laboratory analysis of orthophosphate, ammonia nitrogen, chemical oxygen demand, and total organic carbon. Substrate was made available to the bacterial mass by experimenting with four different chemical emulsifiers. Indigenous microorganisms capable of biotransforming hydrocarbons seem to be present in all the contaminated soil samples received from all sites. Microscopic analysis revealed no visible activity at the beginning of the study and presence of flagellated protozoa, paramecium, rotifers, and nematodes at the end of the year. Nutrient requirements and the limiting factors in microorganism growth were determined for each site. An emulsifier was initially necessary to make the substrate available to the microbial population. Decreases in removal were found with lowered temperature. Removal efficiencies ranged from 50-90%. 95 refs., 11 figs., 13 tabs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1993}
month = {May}
}