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Oil shales of the Lothians, Part III, the chemistry of the oil shales

Journal Article:

Abstract

Tests were performed whereby fuller's earth and lycopodium spore dust were heated to retorting temperatures and the crude oil examined. Oil shale may be composed of the following: Vegetable matter that has been macerated and preserved by combining with salts, spores, and other such material that has been protected from decay, and a proportion of animal matter. Generally, oil shale may be considered as a torbanite that contains a large proportion of inorganic matter, or it may be a torbanite that has deteriorated with age. This supposition is based on the fact that oil yield decreases and the yield of ammonia increases with age.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1912
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-78-042468
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Mem. Geol. Survey; (United Kingdom)
Subject:
04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; OIL SHALES; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; UNITED KINGDOM; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; FULLERS EARTH; HEATING; ORIGIN; RETORTING; SHALE OIL; BITUMINOUS MATERIALS; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CLAYS; ENERGY SOURCES; EUROPE; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; MINERAL OILS; MINERALS; OILS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; SYNTHETIC FUELS; SYNTHETIC PETROLEUM; 040500* - Oil Shales & Tar Sands- Properties & Composition
OSTI ID:
7204624
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 163-166
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Steuart, D R. Oil shales of the Lothians, Part III, the chemistry of the oil shales. United Kingdom: N. p., 1912. Web.
Steuart, D R. Oil shales of the Lothians, Part III, the chemistry of the oil shales. United Kingdom.
Steuart, D R. 1912. "Oil shales of the Lothians, Part III, the chemistry of the oil shales." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_7204624,
title = {Oil shales of the Lothians, Part III, the chemistry of the oil shales}
author = {Steuart, D R}
abstractNote = {Tests were performed whereby fuller's earth and lycopodium spore dust were heated to retorting temperatures and the crude oil examined. Oil shale may be composed of the following: Vegetable matter that has been macerated and preserved by combining with salts, spores, and other such material that has been protected from decay, and a proportion of animal matter. Generally, oil shale may be considered as a torbanite that contains a large proportion of inorganic matter, or it may be a torbanite that has deteriorated with age. This supposition is based on the fact that oil yield decreases and the yield of ammonia increases with age.}
journal = {Mem. Geol. Survey; (United Kingdom)}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1912}
month = {Jan}
}