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Action of sulfurous oxide on plants

Journal Article:

Abstract

In order to ascertain which trees best withstand the action of sulfurous oxide, and are, therefore, best suited for planting in neighborhoods where this gas is given off, young trees of various kinds growing in the open ground, were exposed under glass shades to air containing quantities of sulfurous oxide, varying from 1/10,000 to 1/70,000, under circumstances most favorable to its action, viz., in direct sunlight and after having been watered. The sensitiveness of the leaves was carefully noticed, and also the power which the trees possessed of compensating for injury by the reproduction of leaves; this was found to vary considerably in different trees, as did also the resisting power in the first case. Alder, sycamore, ash, and especially maple, are recommended for growth where exposed to smoke containing sulfurous oxide; next follow birch, hornbeam, and oak, and last, beech. The pines did not give constant results, but in nature they suffer more than other trees, and this is owing to the fact that, although their sensitiveness at first is less than that of other trees, their power of restoring lost leaves is much less.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1873
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-85-178065
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Z. Tierphysiol., Tierernaehr. Futtermittelkd.; (Germany, Federal Republic of); Journal Volume: 16
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; PLANTS; INJURIES; SULFUR OXIDES; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BEECH TREES; BIRCHES; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY; LEAVES; MAPLES; OAKS; PHOTOCHEMICAL OXIDANTS; PINES; SENSITIVITY; SYCAMORES; TREES; CHALCOGENIDES; CONIFERS; DATA; EUROPE; INFORMATION; NUMERICAL DATA; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; WESTERN EUROPE; 560303* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Plants- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
7204471
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
German
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ZTTFA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 447-470
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Schroeder, J. Action of sulfurous oxide on plants. Germany: N. p., 1873. Web.
Schroeder, J. Action of sulfurous oxide on plants. Germany.
Schroeder, J. 1873. "Action of sulfurous oxide on plants." Germany.
@misc{etde_7204471,
title = {Action of sulfurous oxide on plants}
author = {Schroeder, J}
abstractNote = {In order to ascertain which trees best withstand the action of sulfurous oxide, and are, therefore, best suited for planting in neighborhoods where this gas is given off, young trees of various kinds growing in the open ground, were exposed under glass shades to air containing quantities of sulfurous oxide, varying from 1/10,000 to 1/70,000, under circumstances most favorable to its action, viz., in direct sunlight and after having been watered. The sensitiveness of the leaves was carefully noticed, and also the power which the trees possessed of compensating for injury by the reproduction of leaves; this was found to vary considerably in different trees, as did also the resisting power in the first case. Alder, sycamore, ash, and especially maple, are recommended for growth where exposed to smoke containing sulfurous oxide; next follow birch, hornbeam, and oak, and last, beech. The pines did not give constant results, but in nature they suffer more than other trees, and this is owing to the fact that, although their sensitiveness at first is less than that of other trees, their power of restoring lost leaves is much less.}
journal = {Z. Tierphysiol., Tierernaehr. Futtermittelkd.; (Germany, Federal Republic of)}
volume = {16}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Germany}
year = {1873}
month = {Jan}
}