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Enzyme activities in reclaimed coal mine spoils and soils

Abstract

The segregation and stockpiling of topsoil material may reduce enzymatic activities that may hinder normal nutrient cycling processes in reclaimed minelands. The effects of topsoiling and reclamation age on dehydrogenase, nitrogenase, phosphatase, arylsulphatase, amylase, cellulase, invertase and urease activities were evaluated on three reclaimed non-top-soiled and five reclaimed topsoiled areas and compared with an indisturbed reference soil. Three months after topsoiling and revegetation, activities of the enzymes in the reclaimed areas, with the exception of dehydrogenase, were statistically equal to activities of the undisturbed soil. Most enzymes, including dehydrogenase, peaked in the next 1 or 2 years after reclamation with topsoiling and declined thereafter. A 4-year-old topsoiled site (revegetated in 1978) was statistically similar to the undisturbed soil. Amylase activity, however, was significantly lower after the fourth year compared to the undisturbed soil. The non-topsoiled areas, even after 6, 7 and 8 years, appeared to have lower enzyme activities than the younger topsoiled areas or the undisturbed soil. This trend was supported by the finding that the 4-year-old topsoiled site was more enzymatically similar to the undisturbed soil than was the 8-year-old non-topsoiled site (revegetated in 1974). The low enzyme acitivities found in the non-topsoiled areas may be a result  More>>
Publication Date:
Nov 01, 1987
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
ECN-88-020562; EDB-88-166105
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Landscape Urban Plan.; (Netherlands); Journal Volume: 14:5
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; COAL MINES; LAND RECLAMATION; SOILS; ENZYME ACTIVITY; ENZYME REACTIVATION; ENZYMES; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; QUANTITATIVE CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; VEGETATIVE PROPAGATION; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; CLONING; MINES; UNDERGROUND FACILITIES; 010900* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Environmental Aspects; 510500 - Environment, Terrestrial- Site Resource & Use Studies- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
7175579
Research Organizations:
Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station, Albuquerque, NM (USA)
Country of Origin:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: LUPLE
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 359-367
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Fresquez, P R, Aldon, E F, and Lindemann, W C. Enzyme activities in reclaimed coal mine spoils and soils. Netherlands: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.1016/0169-2046(87)90049-1.
Fresquez, P R, Aldon, E F, & Lindemann, W C. Enzyme activities in reclaimed coal mine spoils and soils. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/0169-2046(87)90049-1.
Fresquez, P R, Aldon, E F, and Lindemann, W C. 1987. "Enzyme activities in reclaimed coal mine spoils and soils." Netherlands. doi:10.1016/0169-2046(87)90049-1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0169-2046(87)90049-1.
@misc{etde_7175579,
title = {Enzyme activities in reclaimed coal mine spoils and soils}
author = {Fresquez, P R, Aldon, E F, and Lindemann, W C}
abstractNote = {The segregation and stockpiling of topsoil material may reduce enzymatic activities that may hinder normal nutrient cycling processes in reclaimed minelands. The effects of topsoiling and reclamation age on dehydrogenase, nitrogenase, phosphatase, arylsulphatase, amylase, cellulase, invertase and urease activities were evaluated on three reclaimed non-top-soiled and five reclaimed topsoiled areas and compared with an indisturbed reference soil. Three months after topsoiling and revegetation, activities of the enzymes in the reclaimed areas, with the exception of dehydrogenase, were statistically equal to activities of the undisturbed soil. Most enzymes, including dehydrogenase, peaked in the next 1 or 2 years after reclamation with topsoiling and declined thereafter. A 4-year-old topsoiled site (revegetated in 1978) was statistically similar to the undisturbed soil. Amylase activity, however, was significantly lower after the fourth year compared to the undisturbed soil. The non-topsoiled areas, even after 6, 7 and 8 years, appeared to have lower enzyme activities than the younger topsoiled areas or the undisturbed soil. This trend was supported by the finding that the 4-year-old topsoiled site was more enzymatically similar to the undisturbed soil than was the 8-year-old non-topsoiled site (revegetated in 1974). The low enzyme acitivities found in the non-topsoiled areas may be a result of their adverse chemical and physical properties, as well as the low diversity of microorganisms. These studies demonstrate the value of topsoil use for early establishment of soil processes in reclaimed areas. 3 figs., 19 refs., 8 tabs.}
doi = {10.1016/0169-2046(87)90049-1}
journal = {Landscape Urban Plan.; (Netherlands)}
volume = {14:5}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Netherlands}
year = {1987}
month = {Nov}
}