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Interaction of uranium and organic matter in unaniferous sediments

Conference:

Abstract

Conventional transmission electron microscopy (lattice fringes and dark field techniques) was used for determining the structure and microtexture of some Precambrian organic matter. The samples came from Cluff (Saskatchewan, Canada) and Oklo (Gabon) and contain uranium with organo-metallic bonding (uranium was shown to be present by energy dispersive X-ray analysis carried out in the CTEM). Despite their algal origin, these materials show a high oxygen content. This strong degree of oxidation inhibits the parallel molecular orientation usually produced in carbonaceous products as coalification progresses. Progressive heat-treatment to 3000/sup 0/C produces microporous carbon (50 to 100A). It is, however, partially transformed into graphite in a manner similar to anthracites and non-graphitizable carbons heat-treated under pressure (5 kbars). It is favored by pore flattening, due to pressure, which introduces a long-range, preferred orientation parallel to the flattening plane. Conversely, it is partially prevented by cross-linking due to oxygen. Comparison with materials of higher plant origin (e.g. from Arlit, Niger) suggests a possible mechanism of uranium fixation.
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1980
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-7909224-
Reference Number:
EDB-82-161733
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Phys. Chem. Earth; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 12; Conference: 9. international meeting on organic geochemistry, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK, 17 Sep 1979
Subject:
11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 58 GEOSCIENCES; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; GEOCHEMISTRY; URANIUM DEPOSITS; ANTHRACITE; COALIFICATION; GABON; OKLO PHENOMENON; PRECAMBRIAN ERA; SASKATCHEWAN; TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; URANIUM; ACTINIDES; AFRICA; BLACK COAL; CANADA; CHEMISTRY; COAL; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ELECTRON MICROSCOPY; ELEMENTS; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GEOLOGIC AGES; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; MATERIALS; METALS; MICROSCOPY; MINERAL RESOURCES; NATURAL NUCLEAR REACTORS; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; 050100* - Nuclear Fuels- Reserves, Exploration, & Mining; 580400 - Geochemistry- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
7154630
Research Organizations:
Univ. d'Orleans, France
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: PCEAA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 505-516
Announcement Date:

Conference:

Citation Formats

Rouzaud, J N, Oberlin, A, and Trichet, J. Interaction of uranium and organic matter in unaniferous sediments. United Kingdom: N. p., 1980. Web.
Rouzaud, J N, Oberlin, A, & Trichet, J. Interaction of uranium and organic matter in unaniferous sediments. United Kingdom.
Rouzaud, J N, Oberlin, A, and Trichet, J. 1980. "Interaction of uranium and organic matter in unaniferous sediments." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_7154630,
title = {Interaction of uranium and organic matter in unaniferous sediments}
author = {Rouzaud, J N, Oberlin, A, and Trichet, J}
abstractNote = {Conventional transmission electron microscopy (lattice fringes and dark field techniques) was used for determining the structure and microtexture of some Precambrian organic matter. The samples came from Cluff (Saskatchewan, Canada) and Oklo (Gabon) and contain uranium with organo-metallic bonding (uranium was shown to be present by energy dispersive X-ray analysis carried out in the CTEM). Despite their algal origin, these materials show a high oxygen content. This strong degree of oxidation inhibits the parallel molecular orientation usually produced in carbonaceous products as coalification progresses. Progressive heat-treatment to 3000/sup 0/C produces microporous carbon (50 to 100A). It is, however, partially transformed into graphite in a manner similar to anthracites and non-graphitizable carbons heat-treated under pressure (5 kbars). It is favored by pore flattening, due to pressure, which introduces a long-range, preferred orientation parallel to the flattening plane. Conversely, it is partially prevented by cross-linking due to oxygen. Comparison with materials of higher plant origin (e.g. from Arlit, Niger) suggests a possible mechanism of uranium fixation.}
journal = {Phys. Chem. Earth; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {12}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1980}
month = {Jan}
}