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Brazil's mineral development: potential and problems

Abstract

Brazil's vast mineral wealth still lies in the ground largely unexploited. Lack of adequate communications and the past political instability of the country has greatly hampered mineral exploration, and risk capital for major schemes has only recently been forthcoming. In 1975, Brazil's oil imports alone cost US $3073 million, creating an unhealthy balance of payments deficit and causing the external national debt to reach US $22 billion by the end of that year--an increase of a further 25% in this debt took place during 1976. Substantial price rises in imported machinery followed that of oil, while the prices of Brazil's main exports, coffee, sugar and soya, have continued to fluctuate widely. As a result of the oil price rise Brazil has moved from a traditional trade balance to substantial deficit, although this has fallen from its 1974 peak of 4.6 billion, largely as a result of government policies. Brazil has untapped deposits of bauxite, tin, zinc, iron ore, nickel, as well as oil, and is firmly set on the path that will make her one of the world's major sources of raw materials by the year 2000. The government has made the exploitation of natural resources, particularly the previously neglected  More>>
Publication Date:
Mar 01, 1977
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
ERA-02-035356; EPA-; EDB-77-081962
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Resour. Policy; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 3:1
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; BRAZIL; MINERAL RESOURCES; ENERGY SOURCES; EXPLOITATION; METALS; NATURAL GAS DEPOSITS; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; COMMUNICATIONS; ECONOMICS; ENERGY POLICY; FORECASTING; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; INSTABILITY; MINING; NATURAL GAS; PETROLEUM; PRODUCTION; SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; LATIN AMERICA; RESOURCES; SOUTH AMERICA; 290400* - Energy Planning & Policy- Energy Resources; 290200 - Energy Planning & Policy- Economics & Sociology
OSTI ID:
7116733
Research Organizations:
Development Finance Co. Ltd., London
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: RSPCA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 39-59
Announcement Date:
Jun 01, 1977

Citation Formats

Lloyd, B, and Wheeler, E. Brazil's mineral development: potential and problems. United Kingdom: N. p., 1977. Web. doi:10.1016/0301-4207(77)90047-2.
Lloyd, B, & Wheeler, E. Brazil's mineral development: potential and problems. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0301-4207(77)90047-2.
Lloyd, B, and Wheeler, E. 1977. "Brazil's mineral development: potential and problems." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0301-4207(77)90047-2. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0301-4207(77)90047-2.
@misc{etde_7116733,
title = {Brazil's mineral development: potential and problems}
author = {Lloyd, B, and Wheeler, E}
abstractNote = {Brazil's vast mineral wealth still lies in the ground largely unexploited. Lack of adequate communications and the past political instability of the country has greatly hampered mineral exploration, and risk capital for major schemes has only recently been forthcoming. In 1975, Brazil's oil imports alone cost US $3073 million, creating an unhealthy balance of payments deficit and causing the external national debt to reach US $22 billion by the end of that year--an increase of a further 25% in this debt took place during 1976. Substantial price rises in imported machinery followed that of oil, while the prices of Brazil's main exports, coffee, sugar and soya, have continued to fluctuate widely. As a result of the oil price rise Brazil has moved from a traditional trade balance to substantial deficit, although this has fallen from its 1974 peak of 4.6 billion, largely as a result of government policies. Brazil has untapped deposits of bauxite, tin, zinc, iron ore, nickel, as well as oil, and is firmly set on the path that will make her one of the world's major sources of raw materials by the year 2000. The government has made the exploitation of natural resources, particularly the previously neglected oil and gas sectors, one of the cornerstones of its economic strategy. Yet in 1975 the mineral sector produced less than 2% of Brazil's GNP, although it did contribute 11% of exports. Apart from iron oreand manganese, mineral production is small and the country is still a net importer of copper, zinc, nickel, tin, and lead. Without a substantial increase in exports the government's whole economic/social and political strategy will be at risk.}
doi = {10.1016/0301-4207(77)90047-2}
journal = {Resour. Policy; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {3:1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1977}
month = {Mar}
}