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Soil changes in forest ecosystems: evidence for and probable causes

Conference:

Abstract

A review of the literature on forest soil change in North America, Central Europe, Sweden, U.K., and Australia reveals that changes are occurring in both polluted and unpolluted sites at a greater rate than previously suspected. Acid deposition has played a major role in recent acidification in some areas of Europe and, to a more limited extent, in Sweden and eastern North America. However, rapid rates of soil acidification are occurring in western North America and Australia due to internal processes such as tree uptake and nitrification associated with excessive nitrogen fixation. The presence of extremely acid soils is not necessarily an indicator of significant acidic deposition, as evidenced by their presence in unpolluted, even pristine forests of the north-western U.S.A. and Alaska. Numerous studies in Sweden, Australia, and North America show the important effects of tree uptake and harvesting upon soil acidification in managed forests. Furthermore, arguments can be presented that harvesting takes a greater toll upon the pools of potentially limiting cations than leaching. The rate at which soils are changing in some instances calls for re-evaluation of the budget analyses used to predict soil change. Specifically, inter-horizon changes due to uptake and recycling by vegetation, the interactions  More>>
Authors:
Johnson, D W; [1]  Cresser, M S; [2]  Nilsson, S I; [3]  Turner, John; [4]  Ulrich, Bernhard; [5]  Binkley, Dan; [6]  Cole, D W [7] 
  1. Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Inst. Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (US). Dept. of Range, Wildlife and Forestry
  2. Aberdeen Univ. (GB). Dept. of Soil Science
  3. Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Research
  4. New South Wales Forestry Commission, Sydney (AU). Wood Technology and Forest Research Div.
  5. Goettingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Bodenkunde und Waldernaehrung
  6. Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Forest and Wood Sciences
  7. Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Coll. of Forest Resources
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1990
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-900921-
Reference Number:
GB-92-051950; EDB-92-136127
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Section B. Biology; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 97; Conference: International conference on acid deposition: its nature and impacts, Glasgow (United Kingdom), 16-21 Sep 1990
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; FORESTS; SOILS; ACID RAIN; ACIDIFICATION; AUSTRALIA; EUROPE; NORTH AMERICA; SWEDEN; UNITED KINGDOM; ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATIONS; AUSTRALASIA; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; RAIN; SCANDINAVIA; 540220* - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)
OSTI ID:
7114947
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0080-455X; CODEN: PREBA
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
Pages: 81-116
Announcement Date:

Conference:

Citation Formats

Johnson, D W, Cresser, M S, Nilsson, S I, Turner, John, Ulrich, Bernhard, Binkley, Dan, and Cole, D W. Soil changes in forest ecosystems: evidence for and probable causes. United Kingdom: N. p., 1990. Web.
Johnson, D W, Cresser, M S, Nilsson, S I, Turner, John, Ulrich, Bernhard, Binkley, Dan, & Cole, D W. Soil changes in forest ecosystems: evidence for and probable causes. United Kingdom.
Johnson, D W, Cresser, M S, Nilsson, S I, Turner, John, Ulrich, Bernhard, Binkley, Dan, and Cole, D W. 1990. "Soil changes in forest ecosystems: evidence for and probable causes." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_7114947,
title = {Soil changes in forest ecosystems: evidence for and probable causes}
author = {Johnson, D W, Cresser, M S, Nilsson, S I, Turner, John, Ulrich, Bernhard, Binkley, Dan, and Cole, D W}
abstractNote = {A review of the literature on forest soil change in North America, Central Europe, Sweden, U.K., and Australia reveals that changes are occurring in both polluted and unpolluted sites at a greater rate than previously suspected. Acid deposition has played a major role in recent acidification in some areas of Europe and, to a more limited extent, in Sweden and eastern North America. However, rapid rates of soil acidification are occurring in western North America and Australia due to internal processes such as tree uptake and nitrification associated with excessive nitrogen fixation. The presence of extremely acid soils is not necessarily an indicator of significant acidic deposition, as evidenced by their presence in unpolluted, even pristine forests of the north-western U.S.A. and Alaska. Numerous studies in Sweden, Australia, and North America show the important effects of tree uptake and harvesting upon soil acidification in managed forests. Furthermore, arguments can be presented that harvesting takes a greater toll upon the pools of potentially limiting cations than leaching. The rate at which soils are changing in some instances calls for re-evaluation of the budget analyses used to predict soil change. Specifically, inter-horizon changes due to uptake and recycling by vegetation, the interactions of such changes with naturally-and anthropogenically-produced acids, and the effects of aluminium uptake and recycling need further evaluation and study. (Author).}
journal = {Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Section B. Biology; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {97}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1990}
month = {Jan}
}