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Hepatocyte specific expression of human cloned genes

Conference:

Abstract

A large number of proteins are specifically synthesized in the hepatocyte. Only the adult liver expresses the complete repertoire of functions which are required at various stages during development. There is therefore a complex series of regulatory mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of the differentiated state and for the developmental and physiological variations in the pattern of gene expression. Human hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B display a pattern of gene expression similar to adult and fetal liver, respectively; in contrast, cultured fibroblasts or HeLa cells do not express most of the liver specific genes. They have used these cell lines for transfection experiments with cloned human liver specific genes. DNA segments coding for alpha1-antitrypsin and retinol binding protein (two proteins synthesized both in fetal and adult liver) are expressed in the hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B, but not in HeLa cells or fibroblasts. A DNA segment coding for haptoglobin (a protein synthesized only after birth) is only expressed in the hepatoma cell line HepG2 but not in Hep3B nor in non hepatic cell lines. The information for tissue specific expression is located in the 5' flanking region of all three genes. In vivo competition experiments show that these  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1986
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-8607367-
Reference Number:
EDB-88-124642
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Acta Biol. Hung.; (Hungary); Journal Volume: 37; Conference: 2. European congress on cell biology, Budapest, Hungary, 6 Jul 1986
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; PROTEINS; DNA SEQUENCING; GENE REGULATION; CELL DIFFERENTIATION; CLONE CELLS; FIBROBLASTS; GENE REPRESSORS; HEPATOMAS; IN VIVO; LIVER CELLS; TRANSCRIPTION; VITAMIN A; ANIMAL CELLS; CELL CULTURES; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; DISEASES; NEOPLASMS; NUCLEOPROTEINS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; SOMATIC CELLS; STRUCTURAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; VITAMINS; 550200* - Biochemistry
OSTI ID:
7070393
Research Organizations:
European Molecular Biology Lab., Heidelberg (West Germany)
Country of Origin:
Hungary
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ABHUE
Submitting Site:
JMT
Size:
Pages: 18
Announcement Date:

Conference:

Citation Formats

Cortese, R. Hepatocyte specific expression of human cloned genes. Hungary: N. p., 1986. Web.
Cortese, R. Hepatocyte specific expression of human cloned genes. Hungary.
Cortese, R. 1986. "Hepatocyte specific expression of human cloned genes." Hungary.
@misc{etde_7070393,
title = {Hepatocyte specific expression of human cloned genes}
author = {Cortese, R}
abstractNote = {A large number of proteins are specifically synthesized in the hepatocyte. Only the adult liver expresses the complete repertoire of functions which are required at various stages during development. There is therefore a complex series of regulatory mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of the differentiated state and for the developmental and physiological variations in the pattern of gene expression. Human hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B display a pattern of gene expression similar to adult and fetal liver, respectively; in contrast, cultured fibroblasts or HeLa cells do not express most of the liver specific genes. They have used these cell lines for transfection experiments with cloned human liver specific genes. DNA segments coding for alpha1-antitrypsin and retinol binding protein (two proteins synthesized both in fetal and adult liver) are expressed in the hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and Hep3B, but not in HeLa cells or fibroblasts. A DNA segment coding for haptoglobin (a protein synthesized only after birth) is only expressed in the hepatoma cell line HepG2 but not in Hep3B nor in non hepatic cell lines. The information for tissue specific expression is located in the 5' flanking region of all three genes. In vivo competition experiments show that these DNA segments bind to a common, apparently limiting, transacting factor. Conventional techniques (Bal deletions, site directed mutagenesis, etc.) have been used to precisely identify the DNA sequences responsible for these effects. The emerging picture is complex: they have identified multiple, separate transcriptional signals, essential for maximal promoter activation and tissue specific expression. Some of these signals show a negative effect on transcription in fibroblast cell lines.}
journal = {Acta Biol. Hung.; (Hungary)}
volume = {37}
place = {Hungary}
year = {1986}
month = {Jan}
}