You need JavaScript to view this

Walnut shells: replacement for natural gas

Journal Article:

Abstract

A method of extracting useful energy from cracked walnut shells has been developed by the University of California in co-operation with Diamond/Sunsweet, Inc., and the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission. The technique involves converting the shells to producer gas, a low-Btu gas in which the major combustible components are carbon monoxide (20 to 30%) and hydrogen (10 to 15%).
Publication Date:
Nov 01, 1977
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-81-009001
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Food Eng. Int.; (United States); Journal Volume: 2:11
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; LOW BTU GAS; SYNTHESIS; AGRICULTURAL WASTES; CARBON MONOXIDE; ENERGY SOURCES; HYDROGEN; SEEDS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; NONMETALS; ORGANIC WASTES; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; WASTES; 090122* - Hydrocarbon Fuels- Preparation from Wastes or Biomass- (1976-1989); 140504 - Solar Energy Conversion- Biomass Production & Conversion- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
7046076
Research Organizations:
Univ. of California, Davis
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: FEIND
Submitting Site:
IEA
Size:
Pages: 29-33
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Goss, J R, and Williams, R O. Walnut shells: replacement for natural gas. United States: N. p., 1977. Web.
Goss, J R, & Williams, R O. Walnut shells: replacement for natural gas. United States.
Goss, J R, and Williams, R O. 1977. "Walnut shells: replacement for natural gas." United States.
@misc{etde_7046076,
title = {Walnut shells: replacement for natural gas}
author = {Goss, J R, and Williams, R O}
abstractNote = {A method of extracting useful energy from cracked walnut shells has been developed by the University of California in co-operation with Diamond/Sunsweet, Inc., and the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission. The technique involves converting the shells to producer gas, a low-Btu gas in which the major combustible components are carbon monoxide (20 to 30%) and hydrogen (10 to 15%).}
journal = {Food Eng. Int.; (United States)}
volume = {2:11}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United States}
year = {1977}
month = {Nov}
}