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Overview topic paper on mass media energy conservation communications

Technical Report:

Abstract

The utilization of information diffusion strategies to increase energy conservation knowledge and practices among the general population in Canada is discussed in terms of 5 media functions: information dissemination, remedial behavior modification, lifestyle decisions, initiating conservation action, and crisis management. Each of these functions is critically addressed in terms of media mix, message content and form, timing and intensity, exposure, and specific target populations. The diffusion strategies are then organized into a matrix of policy options to enable the appropriate one to be selected. Four major categories of energy conservation information considered are the nature of the energy problem, methods of conservation, results of conservation, and the individual consumer decision-making process. Heavy television exposure suggests this medium has enormous potential for informing Canadians on conservation issues. Print seems to be the main source of detailed, specialized, and sophisticated kinds of information. However, despite wide media availability, large numbers of the population consistently escape contact with widely reported information. Behavioral modification to change undesirable energy habits is examined from the perspectives of initial change and cultural/social change required to sustain new lifestyles. The use of mass media during crisis situations may be of essential importance for implementation of future energy policies.  More>>
Publication Date:
Feb 01, 1979
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
BCU-021979; CE-01610
Reference Number:
CANM-88-002239; EDB-88-130599
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ENERGY CONSERVATION; INFORMATION DISSEMINATION; CANADA; DECISION MAKING; PUBLIC INFORMATION; REVIEWS; DOCUMENT TYPES; INFORMATION; NORTH AMERICA; 320900* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Education & Public Relations- (1980-)
OSTI ID:
7034088
Research Organizations:
British Columbia Univ., Vancouver (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Availability:
CANMET/TID, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, 555 Booth St., Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1A 0G1; $0.34CAN per page, $3.40 CAN minimum.
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
Pages: 67
Announcement Date:
May 13, 2001

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Vertinsky, P, and Vertinsky, I. Overview topic paper on mass media energy conservation communications. Canada: N. p., 1979. Web.
Vertinsky, P, & Vertinsky, I. Overview topic paper on mass media energy conservation communications. Canada.
Vertinsky, P, and Vertinsky, I. 1979. "Overview topic paper on mass media energy conservation communications." Canada.
@misc{etde_7034088,
title = {Overview topic paper on mass media energy conservation communications}
author = {Vertinsky, P, and Vertinsky, I}
abstractNote = {The utilization of information diffusion strategies to increase energy conservation knowledge and practices among the general population in Canada is discussed in terms of 5 media functions: information dissemination, remedial behavior modification, lifestyle decisions, initiating conservation action, and crisis management. Each of these functions is critically addressed in terms of media mix, message content and form, timing and intensity, exposure, and specific target populations. The diffusion strategies are then organized into a matrix of policy options to enable the appropriate one to be selected. Four major categories of energy conservation information considered are the nature of the energy problem, methods of conservation, results of conservation, and the individual consumer decision-making process. Heavy television exposure suggests this medium has enormous potential for informing Canadians on conservation issues. Print seems to be the main source of detailed, specialized, and sophisticated kinds of information. However, despite wide media availability, large numbers of the population consistently escape contact with widely reported information. Behavioral modification to change undesirable energy habits is examined from the perspectives of initial change and cultural/social change required to sustain new lifestyles. The use of mass media during crisis situations may be of essential importance for implementation of future energy policies. Information dissemination and responses to the mass media do not appear to have the same patterns during crisis and non-crisis situations. 279 refs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1979}
month = {Feb}
}