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Nutrient cycling in Huntington Forest and Turkey Lakes deciduous stands: Nitrogen and sulfur

Journal Article:

Abstract

A study was conducted to analyze two tolerant hardwood forests that are exhibiting different levels of nitrate and sulfate leaching. Fluxes of N and S at the two sites were compared, and the fluxes of nitrate and sulfate through the forest canopy, forest floor, and mineral soil were determined in order to ascertain whether differences in these fluxes could be explained using information on the N, S, and C biogeochemistry of each site. One site is in the Adirondack region, where the impacts of acidic deposition have been noted; the other site is in central Ontario, and has geological, pedological, and hydrological characteristics that make it potentially sensitive to acidic deposition. An increase in concentration of sulfate and nitrate was noted after passage through the canopy at both sites. The Ontario site showed much greater leaching of nitrate. At the Adirondack site only, there was a marked increase in sulfate flux when water leached from the forest floor through the soil. The mineral soil was the largest pool of N and S for both sites. The Ontario soil had a C/N ratio of 16:1, narrower than the 34:1 ratio of the soil at the other site. The former ratio should  More>>
Authors:
Mitchell, M J; [1]  Foster, N W; Morrison, I K; [2]  Shepard, J P [3] 
  1. State Univ. of New York, Syracuse, NY (USA)
  2. Forestry Canada, Sault Ste. Marie, ON (Canada)
  3. National Council of the Paper Industry for Air and Stream Improvement, Gainsville, FL (USA)
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1992
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
CANM-92-0E3231; EDB-92-181647
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Canadian Journal of Forest Research; (Canada); Journal Volume: 22
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; DECIDUOUS TREES; MINERAL CYCLING; ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS; FORESTS; LEACHING; NITRATES; NUTRIENTS; ONTARIO; SULFATES; THROUGHFALL; APPALACHIAN MOUNTAINS; CANADA; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; DISSOLUTION; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; MOUNTAINS; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NORTH AMERICA; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PLANTS; RAIN WATER; SEPARATION PROCESSES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; TREES; WATER; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology
OSTI ID:
7004644
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0045-5067; CODEN: CJFRA
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
Pages: 457-464
Announcement Date:
Dec 15, 1992

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Mitchell, M J, Foster, N W, Morrison, I K, and Shepard, J P. Nutrient cycling in Huntington Forest and Turkey Lakes deciduous stands: Nitrogen and sulfur. Canada: N. p., 1992. Web. doi:10.1139/x92-060.
Mitchell, M J, Foster, N W, Morrison, I K, & Shepard, J P. Nutrient cycling in Huntington Forest and Turkey Lakes deciduous stands: Nitrogen and sulfur. Canada. doi:10.1139/x92-060.
Mitchell, M J, Foster, N W, Morrison, I K, and Shepard, J P. 1992. "Nutrient cycling in Huntington Forest and Turkey Lakes deciduous stands: Nitrogen and sulfur." Canada. doi:10.1139/x92-060. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1139/x92-060.
@misc{etde_7004644,
title = {Nutrient cycling in Huntington Forest and Turkey Lakes deciduous stands: Nitrogen and sulfur}
author = {Mitchell, M J, Foster, N W, Morrison, I K, and Shepard, J P}
abstractNote = {A study was conducted to analyze two tolerant hardwood forests that are exhibiting different levels of nitrate and sulfate leaching. Fluxes of N and S at the two sites were compared, and the fluxes of nitrate and sulfate through the forest canopy, forest floor, and mineral soil were determined in order to ascertain whether differences in these fluxes could be explained using information on the N, S, and C biogeochemistry of each site. One site is in the Adirondack region, where the impacts of acidic deposition have been noted; the other site is in central Ontario, and has geological, pedological, and hydrological characteristics that make it potentially sensitive to acidic deposition. An increase in concentration of sulfate and nitrate was noted after passage through the canopy at both sites. The Ontario site showed much greater leaching of nitrate. At the Adirondack site only, there was a marked increase in sulfate flux when water leached from the forest floor through the soil. The mineral soil was the largest pool of N and S for both sites. The Ontario soil had a C/N ratio of 16:1, narrower than the 34:1 ratio of the soil at the other site. The former ratio should favor accumulation of ammonium and nitrate ions, and subsequent nitrate leaching. Laboratory measurements suggest that the forest floor at the Ontario site may have higher N mineralization rates. Fluxes of N and S within the vegetation were generally similar at both sites. The higher nitrate leaching at the Ontario site may be attributed mostly to stand maturity coupled with tree mortality, but the absence of slow decomposing beech leaf litter and lower C/N ratio in the soil may also be contributing factors. 50 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.}
doi = {10.1139/x92-060}
journal = {Canadian Journal of Forest Research; (Canada)}
volume = {22}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Canada}
year = {1992}
month = {Jan}
}