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Using decomposition kinetics to model the removal of mine water pollutants in constructed wetlands

Journal Article:

Abstract

Although numerous mathematical models have been used to describe decomposition, few, if any, have been used to model the removal of pollutants in constructed wetlands. A steady state method based on decomposition kinetics and reaction stoichiometry has been developed which simulates the removal of ferrous iron entering wetlands constructed for mine drainage treatment. Input variables for the model include organic matter concentration, reaction rate coefficient, porosity and dry density, and hydraulic detection time. Application of the model assumes complete anaerobic conditions within the entire substrate profile, constant temperature, no additional organic matter input, and subsurface flow only. For these ideal conditions, model simulations indicate that wetlands constructed with readily decomposable substrates rich in organic carbon are initially capable of removing far greater amounts of iron than wetlands built with less biodegradable substrates. However, after three to five years of operation this difference becomes negligible. For acceptable long-term treatment performance, therefore, periodic additions of decomposable organic matter will be required.
Authors:
Tarutis, W J; Unz, R F [1] 
  1. Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1994
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
CLA-94-110810; EDB-94-149736
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Water Science and Technology; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 29:4
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ACID MINE DRAINAGE; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; WETLANDS; ANAEROBIC CONDITIONS; CHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; DECOMPOSITION; IRON; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; ORGANIC MATTER; POLLUTANTS; REMOVAL; SEDIMENTS; WASTE WATER; WATER TREATMENT; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CONTROL; ECOSYSTEMS; ELEMENTS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; KINETICS; LIQUID WASTES; MATTER; METALS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION CONTROL; REACTION KINETICS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; WASTES; WATER; 010800* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Waste Management; 010900 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Environmental Aspects; 540320 - Environment, Aquatic- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)
OSTI ID:
6957849
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0273-1223; CODEN: WSTED4
Submitting Site:
CLA
Size:
Pages: 219-226
Announcement Date:
Nov 15, 1994

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Tarutis, W J, and Unz, R F. Using decomposition kinetics to model the removal of mine water pollutants in constructed wetlands. United Kingdom: N. p., 1994. Web.
Tarutis, W J, & Unz, R F. Using decomposition kinetics to model the removal of mine water pollutants in constructed wetlands. United Kingdom.
Tarutis, W J, and Unz, R F. 1994. "Using decomposition kinetics to model the removal of mine water pollutants in constructed wetlands." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_6957849,
title = {Using decomposition kinetics to model the removal of mine water pollutants in constructed wetlands}
author = {Tarutis, W J, and Unz, R F}
abstractNote = {Although numerous mathematical models have been used to describe decomposition, few, if any, have been used to model the removal of pollutants in constructed wetlands. A steady state method based on decomposition kinetics and reaction stoichiometry has been developed which simulates the removal of ferrous iron entering wetlands constructed for mine drainage treatment. Input variables for the model include organic matter concentration, reaction rate coefficient, porosity and dry density, and hydraulic detection time. Application of the model assumes complete anaerobic conditions within the entire substrate profile, constant temperature, no additional organic matter input, and subsurface flow only. For these ideal conditions, model simulations indicate that wetlands constructed with readily decomposable substrates rich in organic carbon are initially capable of removing far greater amounts of iron than wetlands built with less biodegradable substrates. However, after three to five years of operation this difference becomes negligible. For acceptable long-term treatment performance, therefore, periodic additions of decomposable organic matter will be required.}
journal = {Water Science and Technology; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {29:4}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1994}
month = {Jan}
}