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CT-criteria of orbital hemangiomas and their importance in differential diagnosis of intraconal tumors

Journal Article:

Abstract

CT-Scans of 29 histologically proven cavernous hemangiomas were evaluated with respect to their location, shape, delineation from surrounding tissue, contrast-enhancement, and secondary changes of the bony orbit. Whenever a round or oval tumor, located in the outer upper muscle cone, sharply delineated from surrounding tissue, unattached to optic nerve and ocular muscles, spares a small triangular space in the orbital apex, it is in all probability a cavernous hemangioma. Evaluation of the tumors shape and its separation from surrounding tissues requires imaging in multiple sections in two planes oriented, if possible, at right angles. Changes in position of the optic nerve and eye muscles in different directions of gaze demonstrated by CT rule out significant tumor-attachments. The portion of the intraconal space least affected by optic nerve shifts and muscle contractions during eye movements, as demonstrated by CT, is the upper outer quadrant, the site preferred by the mobile tumor. Tumors which cannot be differentiated from cavernous hemangiomas by CT-criteria are rare usually benign. Reports of rare examples of well delineated or encapsulated malignant intraconal lesions indicate the possibility - however remote - of mistaking a malignant tumor for a cavernous hemangioma by CT.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1979
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
AIX-11-558987; EDB-80-129925
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Klin. Monatsbl. Augenheilkd.; (Germany, Federal Republic of); Journal Volume: 175:6
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANGIOMAS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DIAGNOSIS; EYES; PATIENTS; SKELETON; BODY; BODY AREAS; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DISEASES; FACE; HEAD; NEOPLASMS; ORGANS; SENSE ORGANS; TOMOGRAPHY; 550601* - Medicine- Unsealed Radionuclides in Diagnostics
OSTI ID:
6945497
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
German
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: KMAUA
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
Pages: 773-785
Announcement Date:
Dec 01, 1980

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Unsoeld, R, Hoyt, W F, California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neurology and Opthalmology, and California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neuroradiology). CT-criteria of orbital hemangiomas and their importance in differential diagnosis of intraconal tumors. Germany: N. p., 1979. Web.
Unsoeld, R, Hoyt, W F, California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neurology and Opthalmology, & California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neuroradiology). CT-criteria of orbital hemangiomas and their importance in differential diagnosis of intraconal tumors. Germany.
Unsoeld, R, Hoyt, W F, California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neurology and Opthalmology, and California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neuroradiology). 1979. "CT-criteria of orbital hemangiomas and their importance in differential diagnosis of intraconal tumors." Germany.
@misc{etde_6945497,
title = {CT-criteria of orbital hemangiomas and their importance in differential diagnosis of intraconal tumors}
author = {Unsoeld, R, Hoyt, W F, California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neurology and Opthalmology, and California Univ., San Francisco (USA). Dept. of Neuroradiology)}
abstractNote = {CT-Scans of 29 histologically proven cavernous hemangiomas were evaluated with respect to their location, shape, delineation from surrounding tissue, contrast-enhancement, and secondary changes of the bony orbit. Whenever a round or oval tumor, located in the outer upper muscle cone, sharply delineated from surrounding tissue, unattached to optic nerve and ocular muscles, spares a small triangular space in the orbital apex, it is in all probability a cavernous hemangioma. Evaluation of the tumors shape and its separation from surrounding tissues requires imaging in multiple sections in two planes oriented, if possible, at right angles. Changes in position of the optic nerve and eye muscles in different directions of gaze demonstrated by CT rule out significant tumor-attachments. The portion of the intraconal space least affected by optic nerve shifts and muscle contractions during eye movements, as demonstrated by CT, is the upper outer quadrant, the site preferred by the mobile tumor. Tumors which cannot be differentiated from cavernous hemangiomas by CT-criteria are rare usually benign. Reports of rare examples of well delineated or encapsulated malignant intraconal lesions indicate the possibility - however remote - of mistaking a malignant tumor for a cavernous hemangioma by CT.}
journal = {Klin. Monatsbl. Augenheilkd.; (Germany, Federal Republic of)}
volume = {175:6}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Germany}
year = {1979}
month = {Dec}
}