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Relations between scientists and government: the case of nuclear energy

Journal Article:

Abstract

This article discusses the role and influence of the scientific communities in less-developed countries (LDC) on national high-technology policy by examining the particular case of nuclear energy. This area has been largely overlooked by other literature on LDC's scientific development. Based on an examination of scientific involvement in nuclear energy policy in selected countries, it becomes clear that the influence of scientists can range from making cardinal decisions about programs to simply legitimating or implementing decisions made by political or bureaucratic leaders. Within governmental structures, there are opportunities for scientists to incrementally shape technology policies, despite the fact that the magnitude of this influence is circumscribed by domestic considerations, not only of physical resources, but also intangibles such as national prestige and security. While a scientist can on rare occasion seize opportunities to dramatically restructure a nation's scientific or nuclear program, the overwhelming majority of scientists never exercise any such power. But even in day-to-day operations of government scientists can exert subtle influence, not only on nuclear energy programs, but also in an indirect way on the fabric of a nation's culture. Despite this significant impact, in any direct contest between the scientist and the politician, the scientist inevitably loses.  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
May 01, 1982
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-82-163803
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Interciencia; (Venezuela); Journal Volume: 7:3
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL; TECHNOLOGY UTILIZATION; NUCLEAR ENERGY; ENERGY POLICY; DECISION MAKING; POLITICAL ASPECTS; ENERGY; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS; PERSONNEL; 290500* - Energy Planning & Policy- Research, Development, Demonstration, & Commercialization; 290600 - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy
OSTI ID:
6945343
Research Organizations:
George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA
Country of Origin:
Venezuela
Language:
Spanish
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ITRCD
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 141-147
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Katz, J E. Relations between scientists and government: the case of nuclear energy. Venezuela: N. p., 1982. Web.
Katz, J E. Relations between scientists and government: the case of nuclear energy. Venezuela.
Katz, J E. 1982. "Relations between scientists and government: the case of nuclear energy." Venezuela.
@misc{etde_6945343,
title = {Relations between scientists and government: the case of nuclear energy}
author = {Katz, J E}
abstractNote = {This article discusses the role and influence of the scientific communities in less-developed countries (LDC) on national high-technology policy by examining the particular case of nuclear energy. This area has been largely overlooked by other literature on LDC's scientific development. Based on an examination of scientific involvement in nuclear energy policy in selected countries, it becomes clear that the influence of scientists can range from making cardinal decisions about programs to simply legitimating or implementing decisions made by political or bureaucratic leaders. Within governmental structures, there are opportunities for scientists to incrementally shape technology policies, despite the fact that the magnitude of this influence is circumscribed by domestic considerations, not only of physical resources, but also intangibles such as national prestige and security. While a scientist can on rare occasion seize opportunities to dramatically restructure a nation's scientific or nuclear program, the overwhelming majority of scientists never exercise any such power. But even in day-to-day operations of government scientists can exert subtle influence, not only on nuclear energy programs, but also in an indirect way on the fabric of a nation's culture. Despite this significant impact, in any direct contest between the scientist and the politician, the scientist inevitably loses. In conclusion, scientists seem much more aware of their limitations rather than their potential to influence national technology policy, and tend to act in accord with priorities and goals as defined by their nation-state. 18 references.}
journal = {Interciencia; (Venezuela)}
volume = {7:3}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Venezuela}
year = {1982}
month = {May}
}