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Irradiation as an alternative post harvest treatment

Abstract

This current world population has significantly added to the pressures placed upon our finite resources and our resulting ability to feed ourselves. In order to cope with current and future demands, the two established lines of action, that is, reduced population growth and expansion of agricultural production, must be supplemented with the parallel activity of reducing food losses during and after harvest. For developing countries in particular, enormous post-harvest losses result from spillage, contamination, pests and physiological deterioration during storage. Studies in these countries indicate that post-harvest losses are enormous and amount to tens of millions of tons per year valued at billions of dollars. Programs to reduce post-harvest losses, if applied properly, can result in realistic yield increases between 10 and 30%, which can be directly converted into increased consumption for humans. Post-harvest losses vary greatly and are a function of the crop variety, pest combinations in the environment, climate, the system of harvesting, storage, handling, marketing, and even the social and cultural environment. Pests are among the most criticals of these factors. Because of the disastrous potential consequences of such pests, quarantine regulations prohibit the entrance of plants or products which might hide the unwanted pest from countries  More>>
Authors:
Satin, M; [1]  Loaharanu, P [2] 
  1. Agricultural Industries and Post-harvest Management Service, FAO, Rome (Italy)
  2. Head, Food Preservation Section, Joint FAO/ IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Wagramerstr. 5, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1997
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
INIS-MX-121; CONF-9710315-
Reference Number:
SCA: 553004; PA: AIX-30:031631; EDB-99:097394; SN: 99002117791
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. National seminar on acceptance and trade of irradiated foods, Toluca (Mexico), 27-29 Oct 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of 2. National Seminar on Acceptance and Trade of Irradiated Foods. Proceedings; PB: 152 p.; 2. Seminario Nacional Aceptacion y Comercio de Alimentos Irradiados. Memorias
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; AGRICULTURE; CLEAN AIR ACTS; FAO; FOOD; HARVESTING; IAEA; INSECTS; QUARANTINE; RADAPPERTIZATION; RADIATION DOSES; RADICIDATION; RADURIZATION; TRADE
OSTI ID:
689562
Research Organizations:
Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico)
Country of Origin:
Mexico
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE99626784; TRN: MX9900100031631
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE99626784
Submitting Site:
MXN
Size:
pp. 19-28
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Satin, M, and Loaharanu, P. Irradiation as an alternative post harvest treatment. Mexico: N. p., 1997. Web.
Satin, M, & Loaharanu, P. Irradiation as an alternative post harvest treatment. Mexico.
Satin, M, and Loaharanu, P. 1997. "Irradiation as an alternative post harvest treatment." Mexico.
@misc{etde_689562,
title = {Irradiation as an alternative post harvest treatment}
author = {Satin, M, and Loaharanu, P}
abstractNote = {This current world population has significantly added to the pressures placed upon our finite resources and our resulting ability to feed ourselves. In order to cope with current and future demands, the two established lines of action, that is, reduced population growth and expansion of agricultural production, must be supplemented with the parallel activity of reducing food losses during and after harvest. For developing countries in particular, enormous post-harvest losses result from spillage, contamination, pests and physiological deterioration during storage. Studies in these countries indicate that post-harvest losses are enormous and amount to tens of millions of tons per year valued at billions of dollars. Programs to reduce post-harvest losses, if applied properly, can result in realistic yield increases between 10 and 30%, which can be directly converted into increased consumption for humans. Post-harvest losses vary greatly and are a function of the crop variety, pest combinations in the environment, climate, the system of harvesting, storage, handling, marketing, and even the social and cultural environment. Pests are among the most criticals of these factors. Because of the disastrous potential consequences of such pests, quarantine regulations prohibit the entrance of plants or products which might hide the unwanted pest from countries where it is known to exist. Quarantine treatments are can be chemical, physical or ionizing radiation treatment. Numerous investigations on the use of ionizing radiation for the disinfestation of fresh plant materials indicate that rather low dosages will control fruit-fly problems, thus making it well suited for quarantine treatment. The effectiveness of the irradiation as a broad spectrum quarantine treatment of fresh fruits and vegetables was recognized by the several plant protection organizations around the world. Currently, some 40 countries have approved one or more irradiated food items or groups of food including fresh fruits and vegetables for consumption. It is anticipated that the USDA will soon allow irradiation to be used as a quarantine treatment against major species of fruit flies regardless of commodities on a routine basis. The interest in using irradiation as a quarantine treatment of fresh and stored food products has increased recently because methyl bromide (MB), the most widely used fumigant to control insects in food and agricultural commodities, is being phased-out globally under the international treaty for the regulation of ozone depleting substances (Montreal Protocol). Thus, the potential application of ionizing irradiation as a quarantine treatment appears to be very promising. (Author)}
place = {Mexico}
year = {1997}
month = {Dec}
}