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Substrate utilisation by plant-cell cultures

Conference:

Abstract

Plant cell cultures have been grown on a wide range of carbon sources in addition to the traditional ones of sucrose and glucose. Biomass yields and growth rates vary greatly between the different carbon sources and there is a variation in response between different cell cultures to individual carbon sources. Some attempts have been made to grow cell cultures on 'waste' and related carbon sources, such as lactose, maltose, starch, molasses and milk whey. Only maltose was found to support growth to anything near the levels observed with glucose and sucrose. In the case of molasses carbon source cell growth was either non-existent or only just measurable. All the data point to glucose as being the most suitable carbon source, principally on the grounds of biomass yield and growth rate. It should be noted, however, that other carbon sources do appear to have a major (positive) influence on natural product synthesis. Uptake into the cell is an important aspect of carbohydrate utilisation. There is strong evidence that from disaccharides upwards, major degradation to smaller units occurs before uptake. In some cases the necessary enzymes appear to be excreted into the culture broth, in others they may be located within the  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1982
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-8104169-
Reference Number:
EDB-82-162351
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Chem. Technol. Biotechnol.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 32:1; Conference: 2. European congress of biotechnology, Eastbourne, UK, 5 Apr 1981
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; BIODEGRADATION; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; CARBOHYDRATES; PLANT CELLS; GROWTH; BIOSYNTHESIS; CELL CULTURES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; CULTURE MEDIA; ENZYMES; GLUCOSE; LACTOSE; MALTOSE; MOLASSES; PRODUCTIVITY; SACCHAROSE; STARCH; SUBSTRATES; WASTE PROCESSING; WHEY; ALDEHYDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DECOMPOSITION; DISACCHARIDES; HEXOSES; INDUSTRIAL WASTES; KINETICS; MANAGEMENT; MONOSACCHARIDES; OLIGOSACCHARIDES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; POLYSACCHARIDES; PROCESSING; REACTION KINETICS; REAGENTS; SACCHARIDES; SYNTHESIS; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES; 140504* - Solar Energy Conversion- Biomass Production & Conversion- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
6880833
Research Organizations:
The Wolfson Inst. of Biotechnology, Univ. of Sheffield, Sheffield S10 2TN, UK
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: JCTBD
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 338-346
Announcement Date:

Conference:

Citation Formats

Fowler, M W. Substrate utilisation by plant-cell cultures. United Kingdom: N. p., 1982. Web.
Fowler, M W. Substrate utilisation by plant-cell cultures. United Kingdom.
Fowler, M W. 1982. "Substrate utilisation by plant-cell cultures." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_6880833,
title = {Substrate utilisation by plant-cell cultures}
author = {Fowler, M W}
abstractNote = {Plant cell cultures have been grown on a wide range of carbon sources in addition to the traditional ones of sucrose and glucose. Biomass yields and growth rates vary greatly between the different carbon sources and there is a variation in response between different cell cultures to individual carbon sources. Some attempts have been made to grow cell cultures on 'waste' and related carbon sources, such as lactose, maltose, starch, molasses and milk whey. Only maltose was found to support growth to anything near the levels observed with glucose and sucrose. In the case of molasses carbon source cell growth was either non-existent or only just measurable. All the data point to glucose as being the most suitable carbon source, principally on the grounds of biomass yield and growth rate. It should be noted, however, that other carbon sources do appear to have a major (positive) influence on natural product synthesis. Uptake into the cell is an important aspect of carbohydrate utilisation. There is strong evidence that from disaccharides upwards, major degradation to smaller units occurs before uptake. In some cases the necessary enzymes appear to be excreted into the culture broth, in others they may be located within the cell wall; invertase that hydrolyses sucrose is a good example. Once the products of carbohydrate degradation and mobilisation enter the cell they may suffer one of two fates, oxidation or utilisation for biosynthesis. The precise split between these two varies depending on such factors as cell growth rate, cell size, nutrient broth composition and carbohydrate status of the cells. In general rapidly growing cells have a high rate of oxidation, whereas cells growing more slowly tend to be more directed towards biosynthesis. Carbohydrate utilisation is a key area of study, underpinning as it does both biomass yield and natural product synthesis. (Refs. 13).}
journal = {J. Chem. Technol. Biotechnol.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {32:1}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1982}
month = {Jan}
}