You need JavaScript to view this

Bolide impacts and their significance in fossil fuel geochemistry

Abstract

One of the most dramatic scientific theories of the past ten years has been that a collision between the earth and a large meteor or bolide about 10 km in diameter caused mass extinctions of most of the then-existing species (including dinosaurs) at the end of the Cretaceous, 65 million years ago. Controversy continues but, by and large, organic geochemists researching fossil fuels have not been active participants. Only recently has a relationship between kerogen and the all-important iridium anomaly been investigated (Schmitz et al., 1988). Sediment samples at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary contain anomalously high concentrations of iridium, an element whose abundance in the earth's crust is only one ten thousandth of that found in meteorites and presumably in other solar system debris. The purpose of this paper is to briefly raise some questions regarding the bolide impact theory as it affects coal and petroleum deposits. It may well be that organic geochemical evidence will be crucial in either supporting or refuting the impact hypothesis or one of its variations. Even if future research tends to favor widespread explosive volcanism, rather than bolide impacts, the significance of such catastrophic events to the formation and characteristics of fossil fuels needs to  More>>
Authors:
Saxby, J D [1] 
  1. CSIRO Division of Coal Technology (Australia)
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1989
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-90-090966
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Organic Geochemistry; (UK); Journal Volume: 14:5
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 02 PETROLEUM; COAL DEPOSITS; GEOCHEMISTRY; GEOLOGIC HISTORY; CRETACEOUS PERIOD; BOUNDARY CONDITIONS; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; TERTIARY PERIOD; ANIMALS; COAL; CORRELATIONS; DEATH; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; GEOLOGIC MODELS; IRIDIUM; KEROGEN; METEORITES; ORIGIN; PETROLEUM; SEDIMENTS; VOLCANISM; BITUMINOUS MATERIALS; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; CENOZOIC ERA; CHEMISTRY; ELEMENTS; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GEOLOGIC AGES; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; MATERIALS; MESOZOIC ERA; METALS; MINERAL RESOURCES; ORGANIC MATTER; PLATINUM METALS; RESOURCES; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; 010600* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Properties & Composition; 023000 - Petroleum- Properties & Composition; 011000 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration; 020200 - Petroleum- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration
OSTI ID:
6845075
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0146-6380; CODEN: ORGED
Submitting Site:
JMT
Size:
Pages: 569-570
Announcement Date:
Jul 01, 1990

Citation Formats

Saxby, J D. Bolide impacts and their significance in fossil fuel geochemistry. United Kingdom: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.1016/0146-6380(89)90036-3.
Saxby, J D. Bolide impacts and their significance in fossil fuel geochemistry. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0146-6380(89)90036-3.
Saxby, J D. 1989. "Bolide impacts and their significance in fossil fuel geochemistry." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0146-6380(89)90036-3. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0146-6380(89)90036-3.
@misc{etde_6845075,
title = {Bolide impacts and their significance in fossil fuel geochemistry}
author = {Saxby, J D}
abstractNote = {One of the most dramatic scientific theories of the past ten years has been that a collision between the earth and a large meteor or bolide about 10 km in diameter caused mass extinctions of most of the then-existing species (including dinosaurs) at the end of the Cretaceous, 65 million years ago. Controversy continues but, by and large, organic geochemists researching fossil fuels have not been active participants. Only recently has a relationship between kerogen and the all-important iridium anomaly been investigated (Schmitz et al., 1988). Sediment samples at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary contain anomalously high concentrations of iridium, an element whose abundance in the earth's crust is only one ten thousandth of that found in meteorites and presumably in other solar system debris. The purpose of this paper is to briefly raise some questions regarding the bolide impact theory as it affects coal and petroleum deposits. It may well be that organic geochemical evidence will be crucial in either supporting or refuting the impact hypothesis or one of its variations. Even if future research tends to favor widespread explosive volcanism, rather than bolide impacts, the significance of such catastrophic events to the formation and characteristics of fossil fuels needs to be assessed.}
doi = {10.1016/0146-6380(89)90036-3}
journal = {Organic Geochemistry; (UK)}
volume = {14:5}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1989}
month = {Jan}
}