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Global carbon cycle and possible disturbances due to man's interventions

Abstract

Global atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration has increased since the beginning of reliable monitoring in 1958 at a mean rate of about 0.9 ppM CO/sub 2//y. Now, atmospheric, CO/sub 2/ concentration is at 330 ppM. From about 1860 up to 1974, man's intervention in the global carbon cycle caused a likely increase of 76.6 x 10/sup 15/ g C, corresponding to 36 ppM CO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere, if a preindustrial content of 294 ppM CO/sub 2/ or 625.3 x 10/sup 15/ g C is adopted to be valid. A further rise of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ seems to be inevitable and probably will be responsible for a climatic warming in the next several decades; therefore, a global examination of carbon reservoirs and carbon fluxes has been undertaken to determine their storage capacity for excess carbon which originated mainly from burning of fossil fuels and from land clearing. During 1860 to 1974 about 136 x 10/sup 15/ g C have been emitted into the atmosphere by fossil fuel combustion and cement production. At present, the emission rate is about 5 x 10/sup 15/ g C/y. The worldwide examination of carbon release, primarily by deforestation and soil cultivation since 1860, is estimated to  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1979
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-80-129542
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environ. Int.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 2
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; CARBON CYCLE; GLOBAL ASPECTS; CARBON DIOXIDE; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; AIR POLLUTION MONITORS; BIOSPHERE; CARBON; CLIMATES; COMBUSTION; CULTIVATION; DATA; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; EQUATIONS; FOSSIL FUELS; MAN; MATHEMATICS; QUANTITY RATIO; SEAS; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; TEMPERATURE EFFECTS; ANIMALS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; ELEMENTS; ENERGY SOURCES; ENVIRONMENT; FUELS; INFORMATION; MAMMALS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; MONITORS; NONMETALS; OXIDATION; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PRIMATES; SURFACE WATERS; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; VERTEBRATES; 500200* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 010900 - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Environmental Aspects
OSTI ID:
6810078
Research Organizations:
Gederal Environmental Agency, Berlin, Germany
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ENVID
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 357-377
Announcement Date:
Dec 01, 1980

Citation Formats

Pankrath, J. Global carbon cycle and possible disturbances due to man's interventions. United Kingdom: N. p., 1979. Web. doi:10.1016/0160-4120(79)90010-2.
Pankrath, J. Global carbon cycle and possible disturbances due to man's interventions. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0160-4120(79)90010-2.
Pankrath, J. 1979. "Global carbon cycle and possible disturbances due to man's interventions." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0160-4120(79)90010-2. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0160-4120(79)90010-2.
@misc{etde_6810078,
title = {Global carbon cycle and possible disturbances due to man's interventions}
author = {Pankrath, J}
abstractNote = {Global atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentration has increased since the beginning of reliable monitoring in 1958 at a mean rate of about 0.9 ppM CO/sub 2//y. Now, atmospheric, CO/sub 2/ concentration is at 330 ppM. From about 1860 up to 1974, man's intervention in the global carbon cycle caused a likely increase of 76.6 x 10/sup 15/ g C, corresponding to 36 ppM CO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere, if a preindustrial content of 294 ppM CO/sub 2/ or 625.3 x 10/sup 15/ g C is adopted to be valid. A further rise of atmospheric CO/sub 2/ seems to be inevitable and probably will be responsible for a climatic warming in the next several decades; therefore, a global examination of carbon reservoirs and carbon fluxes has been undertaken to determine their storage capacity for excess carbon which originated mainly from burning of fossil fuels and from land clearing. During 1860 to 1974 about 136 x 10/sup 15/ g C have been emitted into the atmosphere by fossil fuel combustion and cement production. At present, the emission rate is about 5 x 10/sup 15/ g C/y. The worldwide examination of carbon release, primarily by deforestation and soil cultivation since 1860, is estimated to be about 120 x 10/sup 15/ g C. The net transfer of carbon to the atmosphere owing to man's interference with the biosphere is now believed to be about 2.4 x 10/sup 15/ g C/y. An oceanic uptake of rougly 179 x 10/sup 15/ g C since 1860 is open to discussion. According to the chemical buffering of sea surface water only about 35.5 x 10/sup 15/ g C could have been absorbed. It is argued, however, that oceanic circulations might have been more effective in removing atmospheric excess carbon of anthropogenic origin.}
doi = {10.1016/0160-4120(79)90010-2}
journal = {Environ. Int.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {2}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1979}
month = {Jan}
}