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Risk estimation and evaluation

Journal Article:

Abstract

Risk assessment involves subjectivity, which makes objective decision making difficult in the nuclear power debate. The author reviews the process and uncertainties of estimating risks as well as the potential for misinterpretation and misuse. Risk data from a variety of aspects cannot be summed because the significance of different risks is not comparable. A method for including political, social, moral, psychological, and economic factors, environmental impacts, catastrophes, and benefits in the evaluation process could involve a broad base of lay and technical consultants, who would explain and argue their evaluation positions. 15 references. (DCK)
Authors:
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1982
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-83-042186
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Sci. Public Policy; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 9:5
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; NUCLEAR POWER; RISK ASSESSMENT; POWER GENERATION; EVALUATION; CONSULTANTS; DECISION MAKING; POWER; 290600* - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy; 296000 - Energy Planning & Policy- Electric Power
OSTI ID:
6805727
Research Organizations:
Energy Cost Surveys Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne, England
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: SPPLB
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 251-254
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Ferguson, R A.D. Risk estimation and evaluation. United Kingdom: N. p., 1982. Web.
Ferguson, R A.D. Risk estimation and evaluation. United Kingdom.
Ferguson, R A.D. 1982. "Risk estimation and evaluation." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_6805727,
title = {Risk estimation and evaluation}
author = {Ferguson, R A.D.}
abstractNote = {Risk assessment involves subjectivity, which makes objective decision making difficult in the nuclear power debate. The author reviews the process and uncertainties of estimating risks as well as the potential for misinterpretation and misuse. Risk data from a variety of aspects cannot be summed because the significance of different risks is not comparable. A method for including political, social, moral, psychological, and economic factors, environmental impacts, catastrophes, and benefits in the evaluation process could involve a broad base of lay and technical consultants, who would explain and argue their evaluation positions. 15 references. (DCK)}
journal = {Sci. Public Policy; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {9:5}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1982}
month = {Oct}
}