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Nodulation of legumes, nitrogenase activity of roots and occurrence of nitrogen-fixing Azospirillum spp. In representative soils of central Amazonia

Abstract

Leguminosae do not predominate in the Brazilian Amazon rain forest, although they are among the five best represented families. Plant roots from various soils were examined for the presence of nodules, acetylene-reducing activity and N/sub 2/-fixing Azospirillum spp. Abundant nodulation was found in black earth (''terra preta dos indios'') and in one case on sandy soil under campinarana vegetation along a tributary of the upper Rio Negro. In sandy latosol some nodules occurred in secondary forest and fewer in primary forest. Legumes in disturbed clayey or sandy latosol showed more frequent nodulation. Primary forest on alluvial (''varzea'') soil, and in Bahia coastal rain forest on sandy latosol and Erythrina glauca used for shading cacao plantations were abundantly nodulated. Acetylene reduction assays showed no, or very little, nitrogenase activity of roots from primary or secondary forest on clayey latosol near Manaus. Nodulated roots from secondary forest on sandy latosol showed acetylene-reducing activity. High rates of acetylene reduction were observed in nodulated roots of primary forest on alluvial ''varzea'' soil. Root samples showed ethylene absorption in controls without acetylene which might interfere with the results of acetylene reduction tests. The incidence of Azospirillum was also higher in black earth than the other  More>>
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1980
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-83-003253
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Agro-Ecosystems; (Netherlands); Journal Volume: 6:3
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; LEGUMINOSAE; NITROGENASE; MICROORGANISMS; NITROGEN FIXATION; ALKYNES; BRAZIL; FORESTS; SOILS; TROPICAL REGIONS; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ENZYMES; HYDROCARBONS; LATIN AMERICA; NITRO-GROUP DEHYDROGENASES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXIDOREDUCTASES; PLANTS; SOUTH AMERICA; 140504* - Solar Energy Conversion- Biomass Production & Conversion- (-1989); 550700 - Microbiology
OSTI ID:
6742219
Research Organizations:
Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA) CAIXA Postal: 478, 69000 - Manaus Amazonas (Brazil)
Country of Origin:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: AECOD
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 249-266
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Sylvester-Bradley, R, De Oliverira, L A, De Podesta Filho, J A, and John, T V. Nodulation of legumes, nitrogenase activity of roots and occurrence of nitrogen-fixing Azospirillum spp. In representative soils of central Amazonia. Netherlands: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.1016/0304-3746(80)90025-6.
Sylvester-Bradley, R, De Oliverira, L A, De Podesta Filho, J A, & John, T V. Nodulation of legumes, nitrogenase activity of roots and occurrence of nitrogen-fixing Azospirillum spp. In representative soils of central Amazonia. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/0304-3746(80)90025-6.
Sylvester-Bradley, R, De Oliverira, L A, De Podesta Filho, J A, and John, T V. 1980. "Nodulation of legumes, nitrogenase activity of roots and occurrence of nitrogen-fixing Azospirillum spp. In representative soils of central Amazonia." Netherlands. doi:10.1016/0304-3746(80)90025-6. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0304-3746(80)90025-6.
@misc{etde_6742219,
title = {Nodulation of legumes, nitrogenase activity of roots and occurrence of nitrogen-fixing Azospirillum spp. In representative soils of central Amazonia}
author = {Sylvester-Bradley, R, De Oliverira, L A, De Podesta Filho, J A, and John, T V}
abstractNote = {Leguminosae do not predominate in the Brazilian Amazon rain forest, although they are among the five best represented families. Plant roots from various soils were examined for the presence of nodules, acetylene-reducing activity and N/sub 2/-fixing Azospirillum spp. Abundant nodulation was found in black earth (''terra preta dos indios'') and in one case on sandy soil under campinarana vegetation along a tributary of the upper Rio Negro. In sandy latosol some nodules occurred in secondary forest and fewer in primary forest. Legumes in disturbed clayey or sandy latosol showed more frequent nodulation. Primary forest on alluvial (''varzea'') soil, and in Bahia coastal rain forest on sandy latosol and Erythrina glauca used for shading cacao plantations were abundantly nodulated. Acetylene reduction assays showed no, or very little, nitrogenase activity of roots from primary or secondary forest on clayey latosol near Manaus. Nodulated roots from secondary forest on sandy latosol showed acetylene-reducing activity. High rates of acetylene reduction were observed in nodulated roots of primary forest on alluvial ''varzea'' soil. Root samples showed ethylene absorption in controls without acetylene which might interfere with the results of acetylene reduction tests. The incidence of Azospirillum was also higher in black earth than the other soils examined, and in soils with higher pH. The hypothesis that Azospirillum is associated with Trema micantha roots was refuted. Roots and soils collected under cultivated grasses showed a higher incidence of Azospirillum when fertilized with phosphorus and lime. Results indicate that nitrogen fixation did occur in association with roots in some soils, but not with roots of primary or secondary forest on clayey latosol in the vicinity of Manaus, which is the most common soil in Central Amazonia. The possible reasons for this are discussed.}
doi = {10.1016/0304-3746(80)90025-6}
journal = {Agro-Ecosystems; (Netherlands)}
volume = {6:3}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Netherlands}
year = {1980}
month = {Dec}
}