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Relevance of medieval, Egyptian and American dates to the study of climatic and radiocarbon variability

Abstract

Basic radiocarbon dating and dendrochronology have been combined to yield calibrated dates that are more accurate than conventional radiocarbon dates. This has been shown to be true for medieval and Egyptian dynastic dating. Because radiocarbon is a cosmogenically produced radioisotope, heliomagnetic and geomagnetic fields play a major role in its synthesis in the Earth's upper atmosphere. Inasmuch as a calibrated radiocarbon record exists for nearly 10 000 years, we now seem to possess in the short-time variations of the production rate a history of solar activity expressed via heliomagnetic fields carried by the solar wind. In turn, solar activity has a controlling effect on climate on Earth within modifications provided by the complex interactions of the atmosphere-Earth-ocean system. Both radiocarbon measurements and other empirical research methods agree on variations of climate during historically more recent periods on Earth. This leads to the suggestion that the radiocarbon calibration curve may be also a significant indicator or tracer for climatic changes for the Holocene or the Neolithic-Mesolithic. (author).
Authors:
Berger, R [1] 
  1. California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (USA). Inst. of Geophysics and Planetary Physics
Publication Date:
Apr 24, 1990
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
AIX-21-066666; EDB-90-124674
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series A; (UK); Journal Volume: 330:1615
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 58 GEOSCIENCES; CARBON 14; CALIBRATION; TIME-SERIES ANALYSIS; CLIMATES; SOLAR ACTIVITY; VARIATIONS; PINES; ACCURACY; CALIFORNIA; COMPILED DATA; COSMIC RADIATION; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; EGYPTIAN ARAB REPUBLIC; GEOMAGNETIC FIELD; HELIOSPHERE; ISOTOPE DATING; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; AFRICA; AGE ESTIMATION; ATMOSPHERES; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; CARBON ISOTOPES; CONIFERS; DATA; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; EVEN-EVEN NUCLEI; FEDERAL REGION IX; INFORMATION; IONIZING RADIATIONS; ISOTOPES; LIGHT NUCLEI; MAGNETIC FIELDS; MATHEMATICS; NORTH AMERICA; NUCLEI; NUMERICAL DATA; PINOPHYTA; PLANTS; RADIATIONS; RADIOISOTOPES; SOLAR ATMOSPHERE; TREES; USA; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; 400101* - Activation, Nuclear Reaction, Radiometric & Radiochemical Procedures; 640104 - Astrophysics & Cosmology- Solar Phenomena; 580000 - Geosciences
OSTI ID:
6717854
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0080-4614; CODEN: PTRMA
Submitting Site:
GBN
Size:
Pages: 517-527
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Berger, R. Relevance of medieval, Egyptian and American dates to the study of climatic and radiocarbon variability. United Kingdom: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1098/rsta.1990.0033.
Berger, R. Relevance of medieval, Egyptian and American dates to the study of climatic and radiocarbon variability. United Kingdom. doi:10.1098/rsta.1990.0033.
Berger, R. 1990. "Relevance of medieval, Egyptian and American dates to the study of climatic and radiocarbon variability." United Kingdom. doi:10.1098/rsta.1990.0033. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1098/rsta.1990.0033.
@misc{etde_6717854,
title = {Relevance of medieval, Egyptian and American dates to the study of climatic and radiocarbon variability}
author = {Berger, R}
abstractNote = {Basic radiocarbon dating and dendrochronology have been combined to yield calibrated dates that are more accurate than conventional radiocarbon dates. This has been shown to be true for medieval and Egyptian dynastic dating. Because radiocarbon is a cosmogenically produced radioisotope, heliomagnetic and geomagnetic fields play a major role in its synthesis in the Earth's upper atmosphere. Inasmuch as a calibrated radiocarbon record exists for nearly 10 000 years, we now seem to possess in the short-time variations of the production rate a history of solar activity expressed via heliomagnetic fields carried by the solar wind. In turn, solar activity has a controlling effect on climate on Earth within modifications provided by the complex interactions of the atmosphere-Earth-ocean system. Both radiocarbon measurements and other empirical research methods agree on variations of climate during historically more recent periods on Earth. This leads to the suggestion that the radiocarbon calibration curve may be also a significant indicator or tracer for climatic changes for the Holocene or the Neolithic-Mesolithic. (author).}
doi = {10.1098/rsta.1990.0033}
journal = {Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, Series A; (UK)}
volume = {330:1615}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1990}
month = {Apr}
}