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Splicing of a C. elegans myosin pre-mRNA in a human nuclear extract

Journal Article:

Abstract

Splicing of mammalian introns requires that the intron possess at least 80 nucleotides. This length requirement presumably reflects the constraints of accommodating multiple snRNPs simultaneously in the same intro. In the free-living nematode, C. elegans, introns typically are 45 to 55 nucleotides in length. In this report, the authors determine whether C. elegans introns can obviate the mammalian length requirement by virtue of their structure or sequence. They demonstrate that a 53 nucleotide intron from the unc-54 gene of C. elegans does not undergo splicing in a mammalian (HeLa) nuclear extract. However, insertion of 31 nucleotides of foreign, prokaryotic sequence into the same intron results in efficient splicing. The observed splicing proceeds by the same two-step mechanism observed with mammalian introns, and exploits the same 3{prime} and 5{prime} sites as are used in C. elegans. The branch point used lies in the inserted sequences. They conclude that C. elegans splicing components are either fewer in number or smaller than their mammalian counterparts.
Authors:
Ogg, S C; Anderson, P; Wickens, M P [1] 
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA)
Publication Date:
Jan 11, 1990
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-90-134626
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nucleic Acids Research; (UK); Journal Volume: 18:1
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; MESSENGER-RNA; MOLECULAR STRUCTURE; MYOSIN; TRANSCRIPTION; BACTERIA; DNA SEQUENCING; ELECTROPHORESIS; GENE RECOMBINATION; MAN; NUCLEOPROTEINS; PLASMIDS; RNA POLYMERASES; ANIMALS; CELL CONSTITUENTS; ENZYMES; GLOBULINS; MAMMALS; MICROORGANISMS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; NUCLEOTIDYLTRANSFERASES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PHOSPHORUS-GROUP TRANSFERASES; POLYMERASES; PRIMATES; PROTEINS; RNA; STRUCTURAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; TRANSFERASES; VERTEBRATES; 550200* - Biochemistry
OSTI ID:
6705561
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0305-1048; CODEN: NARHA
Submitting Site:
JMT
Size:
Pages: 143-149
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Ogg, S C, Anderson, P, and Wickens, M P. Splicing of a C. elegans myosin pre-mRNA in a human nuclear extract. United Kingdom: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1093/nar/18.1.143.
Ogg, S C, Anderson, P, & Wickens, M P. Splicing of a C. elegans myosin pre-mRNA in a human nuclear extract. United Kingdom. doi:10.1093/nar/18.1.143.
Ogg, S C, Anderson, P, and Wickens, M P. 1990. "Splicing of a C. elegans myosin pre-mRNA in a human nuclear extract." United Kingdom. doi:10.1093/nar/18.1.143. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1093/nar/18.1.143.
@misc{etde_6705561,
title = {Splicing of a C. elegans myosin pre-mRNA in a human nuclear extract}
author = {Ogg, S C, Anderson, P, and Wickens, M P}
abstractNote = {Splicing of mammalian introns requires that the intron possess at least 80 nucleotides. This length requirement presumably reflects the constraints of accommodating multiple snRNPs simultaneously in the same intro. In the free-living nematode, C. elegans, introns typically are 45 to 55 nucleotides in length. In this report, the authors determine whether C. elegans introns can obviate the mammalian length requirement by virtue of their structure or sequence. They demonstrate that a 53 nucleotide intron from the unc-54 gene of C. elegans does not undergo splicing in a mammalian (HeLa) nuclear extract. However, insertion of 31 nucleotides of foreign, prokaryotic sequence into the same intron results in efficient splicing. The observed splicing proceeds by the same two-step mechanism observed with mammalian introns, and exploits the same 3{prime} and 5{prime} sites as are used in C. elegans. The branch point used lies in the inserted sequences. They conclude that C. elegans splicing components are either fewer in number or smaller than their mammalian counterparts.}
doi = {10.1093/nar/18.1.143}
journal = {Nucleic Acids Research; (UK)}
volume = {18:1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1990}
month = {Jan}
}