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Application of natural gas to the direct reduction of iron ore

Journal Article:

Abstract

The Gas Committee of the U.N. Economic Commission for Europe evaluated the potentials of natural gas for direct reduction of iron ore. The report, based essentially on that by the Italian representative E. Pasero with comments and observations from experts of the other member countries, indicated the general tendency of the iron and steel industry to use natural gas to reduce production costs by reducing coke consumption. By the end of 1972, gas consumption by these industries was reported at 38.8 billion Btu/ton (10.79 Gcal/m ton) by the Steel Committee of the U.N. Economic Commission at the symposium on the economic and technical aspects of the direct reduction of iron ore, held in September 1972 in Bucharest. In comparison, coke consumption was 9.5 billion Btu/ton (2.64 Gcal/m ton) steel, liquid hydrocarbons 3.1 billion Btu (0.85 Gcal), and electricity 16.1 billion Btu (4.46 Gcal). Natural gas was used mainly for ore reduction and generation of the reducing gas in-shaft furnaces with backdraft heating circulation, fixed-bed furances (Hyl type), and fluidized-bed reactors. Processes include the Midrex (shaft furnace), H.I.B. (fluidized bed), and Novalfer (fluidized bed). These processes are used to obtain 4.5 million tons/yr of iron sponge for the production of steel  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
May 01, 1975
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-84-137400
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Gaz Aujourd'hui; (France); Journal Volume: 99
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; COKE; CONSUMPTION RATES; USES; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; RECOMMENDATIONS; IRON ORES; REDUCTION; NATURAL GAS; EUROPE; JAPAN; METAL INDUSTRY; NUMERICAL DATA; REDUCING AGENTS; USA; ASIA; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DATA; ENERGY SOURCES; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; INDUSTRY; INFORMATION; NORTH AMERICA; ORES; 033000* - Natural Gas- Properties & Composition; 030600 - Natural Gas- Economic, Industrial, & Business Aspects
OSTI ID:
6697941
Country of Origin:
France
Language:
French
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: GAZJA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 159-167
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Not Available. Application of natural gas to the direct reduction of iron ore. France: N. p., 1975. Web.
Not Available. Application of natural gas to the direct reduction of iron ore. France.
Not Available. 1975. "Application of natural gas to the direct reduction of iron ore." France.
@misc{etde_6697941,
title = {Application of natural gas to the direct reduction of iron ore}
author = {Not Available}
abstractNote = {The Gas Committee of the U.N. Economic Commission for Europe evaluated the potentials of natural gas for direct reduction of iron ore. The report, based essentially on that by the Italian representative E. Pasero with comments and observations from experts of the other member countries, indicated the general tendency of the iron and steel industry to use natural gas to reduce production costs by reducing coke consumption. By the end of 1972, gas consumption by these industries was reported at 38.8 billion Btu/ton (10.79 Gcal/m ton) by the Steel Committee of the U.N. Economic Commission at the symposium on the economic and technical aspects of the direct reduction of iron ore, held in September 1972 in Bucharest. In comparison, coke consumption was 9.5 billion Btu/ton (2.64 Gcal/m ton) steel, liquid hydrocarbons 3.1 billion Btu (0.85 Gcal), and electricity 16.1 billion Btu (4.46 Gcal). Natural gas was used mainly for ore reduction and generation of the reducing gas in-shaft furnaces with backdraft heating circulation, fixed-bed furances (Hyl type), and fluidized-bed reactors. Processes include the Midrex (shaft furnace), H.I.B. (fluidized bed), and Novalfer (fluidized bed). These processes are used to obtain 4.5 million tons/yr of iron sponge for the production of steel in electric furnaces. The natural gas outlook for direct reduction of iron will depend on local conditions and fuel availability. Its industrial application has been most successful in mini-steel installations, especially in the U.S., Japan, and Western Europe, and it is recommended for developing countries with no steel-industry basis.}
journal = {Gaz Aujourd'hui; (France)}
volume = {99}
journal type = {AC}
place = {France}
year = {1975}
month = {May}
}