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The safety of nuclear power plants

Abstract

Do nuclear power plants present an unjustifiable risk Can there be confidence in their safety The Uranium Institute invited a group of senior safety experts from eight different Western countries operating different types of reactors to provide an authoritative explanation for non-specialists of the basic principles of reactor safety, their application and their implications. The report presents the group's opinion on the level of safety achieved in the Western nuclear power plants with which the authors are directly familiar. Although many of the points made may well also be true for non-Western reactors, the report does not cover them except where specifically stated. It does describe and discuss the causes of the Chernobyl disaster. It does not compare nuclear power with other fuels, nor does it deal with its benefits, since however great the benefits from the peaceful use of nuclear power, and its own advantages over other fuels, they could not compensate for lack of safety. The conclusion reached is that the risk associated with electricity production at nuclear power plants can be kept very low. Proper use of the extensive knowledge available today can guarantee operation of nuclear power plants at very high safety levels, carrying very low  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1988
Product Type:
Book
Reference Number:
AIX-21-072003; EDB-90-131251
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; REACTOR SAFETY; RISK ASSESSMENT; CHERNOBYLSK-4 REACTOR; ELECTRIC POWER; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; EVALUATION; PLANNING; RADIATION HAZARDS; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; SPECIFICATIONS; URANIUM INSTITUTE; ACCIDENTS; ENRICHED URANIUM REACTORS; GRAPHITE MODERATED REACTORS; HAZARDS; HEALTH HAZARDS; INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; LWGR TYPE REACTORS; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; POWER; POWER PLANTS; POWER REACTORS; REACTORS; SAFETY; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; THERMAL REACTORS; WATER COOLED REACTORS; 220900* - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Reactor Safety; 290600 - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy
OSTI ID:
6663063
Research Organizations:
Uranium Inst., London (UK)
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN: 0 946777 14 4
Submitting Site:
GBN
Size:
Pages: (66 p)
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Not Available. The safety of nuclear power plants. United Kingdom: N. p., 1988. Web.
Not Available. The safety of nuclear power plants. United Kingdom.
Not Available. 1988. "The safety of nuclear power plants." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_6663063,
title = {The safety of nuclear power plants}
author = {Not Available}
abstractNote = {Do nuclear power plants present an unjustifiable risk Can there be confidence in their safety The Uranium Institute invited a group of senior safety experts from eight different Western countries operating different types of reactors to provide an authoritative explanation for non-specialists of the basic principles of reactor safety, their application and their implications. The report presents the group's opinion on the level of safety achieved in the Western nuclear power plants with which the authors are directly familiar. Although many of the points made may well also be true for non-Western reactors, the report does not cover them except where specifically stated. It does describe and discuss the causes of the Chernobyl disaster. It does not compare nuclear power with other fuels, nor does it deal with its benefits, since however great the benefits from the peaceful use of nuclear power, and its own advantages over other fuels, they could not compensate for lack of safety. The conclusion reached is that the risk associated with electricity production at nuclear power plants can be kept very low. Proper use of the extensive knowledge available today can guarantee operation of nuclear power plants at very high safety levels, carrying very low risks, both to health and of contamination of the environment: risks that are continually lowered by upgrading existing plants and their operation, and by the design of future power plants. (author).}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1988}
month = {Jan}
}