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Cupriferous peat: embryonic copper ore

Journal Article:

Abstract

A Canadian peat was found to contain up to 10% (dry weight) Cu, and a mechanism for Cu accumulation in peat was discussed. Wet chemical techniques and x-ray diffraction were utilized to identify Cu compounds. Copper was organically bound in peat as a chelate complex and did not occur as an oxide, sulfide, or as elemental Cu. Because of the low S content of peat the Cu was assumed to be bound to nitrogen or oxygen-containing components. Copper, having a greater affinity for N, tended to form the more stable Cu-N chelate. The element was concentrated as circulating cupriferous ground waters filtered through the peat.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1961
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-81-043205
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Can. Min. Metall. Bull.; (Canada); Journal Volume: 54
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COPPER; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; X-RAY DIFFRACTION; PEAT; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; CANADA; CHELATES; COPPER COMPLEXES; GROUND WATER; LEACHING; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS; COHERENT SCATTERING; COMPLEXES; DIFFRACTION; DISSOLUTION; ELEMENTS; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; METALS; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC MATTER; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SCATTERING; SEPARATION PROCESSES; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPLEXES; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; WATER; 010600* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Properties & Composition
OSTI ID:
6627535
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: CMMBA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 500-503
Announcement Date:
Apr 01, 1981

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Fraser, D C. Cupriferous peat: embryonic copper ore. Canada: N. p., 1961. Web.
Fraser, D C. Cupriferous peat: embryonic copper ore. Canada.
Fraser, D C. 1961. "Cupriferous peat: embryonic copper ore." Canada.
@misc{etde_6627535,
title = {Cupriferous peat: embryonic copper ore}
author = {Fraser, D C}
abstractNote = {A Canadian peat was found to contain up to 10% (dry weight) Cu, and a mechanism for Cu accumulation in peat was discussed. Wet chemical techniques and x-ray diffraction were utilized to identify Cu compounds. Copper was organically bound in peat as a chelate complex and did not occur as an oxide, sulfide, or as elemental Cu. Because of the low S content of peat the Cu was assumed to be bound to nitrogen or oxygen-containing components. Copper, having a greater affinity for N, tended to form the more stable Cu-N chelate. The element was concentrated as circulating cupriferous ground waters filtered through the peat.}
journal = {Can. Min. Metall. Bull.; (Canada)}
volume = {54}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Canada}
year = {1961}
month = {Jul}
}