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Sludge, garbage may fuel California sewage plant

Journal Article:

Abstract

The combustion and pyrolysis of sewage sludge and refuse-derived fuel (RFD) in multiple-hearth furnaces were recommended as a means of generating energy to power the Central Contra Costa Sanitary District's 30 mgd wastewater treatment plant using an off-gas from the pyrolysis process. In a full-scale test, a furnace in Concord, once used for sewage sludge incineration, was operated under O/sub 2/-starved conditions by limiting air addition through the burners and air nozzles, resulting in partial combustion. Using temperature as the controlled variable, the process was regulated to form a fuel gas through composition of the organic feed matter. Just enough fuel gas was combusted to evaporate moisture in the feed solids and furnish heat for the decomposition process. During most of the testing the afterburner was maintained at a temperature > 1400/sup 0/F with pyrolysis gas. At this temperature, automatic ignition of the gas occurred. When the gas generated dropped to a low heat of combustion because of high feed moisture content, the afterburner burner was used to ignite the gas. Some test observations are discussed. Preparation of the solid waste for processing by the use of shredders, air classifiers, and magnetic separators is described.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1977
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-81-037824
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Am. City Cty.; (United States); Journal Volume: 92:1
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; PYROLYTIC GASES; COMBUSTION; SEWAGE SLUDGE; PYROLYSIS; WASTE PROCESSING PLANTS; ON-SITE POWER GENERATION; CALIFORNIA; TESTING; VERY HIGH TEMPERATURE; WASTE PROCESSING; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DECOMPOSITION; FLUIDS; GASES; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; MANAGEMENT; NORTH AMERICA; OXIDATION; POWER GENERATION; PROCESSING; PYROLYSIS PRODUCTS; SEWAGE; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; USA; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTES; WESTERN REGION; 090122* - Hydrocarbon Fuels- Preparation from Wastes or Biomass- (1976-1989); 200103 - Fossil-Fueled Power Plants- Waste-Fueled Systems; 320604 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Municipalities & Community Systems- Municipal Waste Management- (1980-)
OSTI ID:
6626633
Research Organizations:
Brown and Caldwell, Walnut Creek, CA
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ACCOD
Submitting Site:
IEA
Size:
Pages: 37-38
Announcement Date:
Apr 01, 1981

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Sieger, R B. Sludge, garbage may fuel California sewage plant. United States: N. p., 1977. Web.
Sieger, R B. Sludge, garbage may fuel California sewage plant. United States.
Sieger, R B. 1977. "Sludge, garbage may fuel California sewage plant." United States.
@misc{etde_6626633,
title = {Sludge, garbage may fuel California sewage plant}
author = {Sieger, R B}
abstractNote = {The combustion and pyrolysis of sewage sludge and refuse-derived fuel (RFD) in multiple-hearth furnaces were recommended as a means of generating energy to power the Central Contra Costa Sanitary District's 30 mgd wastewater treatment plant using an off-gas from the pyrolysis process. In a full-scale test, a furnace in Concord, once used for sewage sludge incineration, was operated under O/sub 2/-starved conditions by limiting air addition through the burners and air nozzles, resulting in partial combustion. Using temperature as the controlled variable, the process was regulated to form a fuel gas through composition of the organic feed matter. Just enough fuel gas was combusted to evaporate moisture in the feed solids and furnish heat for the decomposition process. During most of the testing the afterburner was maintained at a temperature > 1400/sup 0/F with pyrolysis gas. At this temperature, automatic ignition of the gas occurred. When the gas generated dropped to a low heat of combustion because of high feed moisture content, the afterburner burner was used to ignite the gas. Some test observations are discussed. Preparation of the solid waste for processing by the use of shredders, air classifiers, and magnetic separators is described.}
journal = {Am. City Cty.; (United States)}
volume = {92:1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United States}
year = {1977}
month = {Jan}
}