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Aquatic chemistry of acid deposition

Journal Article:

Abstract

The occurrence of acid precipitation in many regions of the Northern hemisphere is a consequnece of human interference in the cycles that unite land, water and atmosphere. The oxidation of carbon, sulfur and nitrogen, resulting mostly from fossil fuel burning, rivals oxidation processes induced by photosynthesis and respiration and disturbs redox conditions in the atmosphere. The paper discusses oxidation-reduction reactions, particularly those involving atmospheric pollutants that are important in the formation of acid precipitation. Topics covered are: a stoichiometric model of acid rain formation; sulfur dioxide and ammonia adsorption; acid neutralizing capacity. The paper concludes that explanations of simple chemical equilibria between gases and water aid our understanding of how acidifying gases become dissolved in cloud water, in droplets of falling rain, or in fog. Rigorous definitions of base- or acid-neutralizing capacities are prerequisites to measuring and interpreting residual acidity in dry and wet deposition and for assessing the disturbance caused by the transfer of acid to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. 20 references.
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1987
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-87-082596
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environ. Sci. Technol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 21:1
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ACID RAIN; ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; RISK ASSESSMENT; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS; ACID NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY; ADSORPTION; AIR POLLUTION; AMMONIA; ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATIONS; CARBON; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; COMBUSTION; DEPOSITION; EQUILIBRIUM; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; GLOBAL ASPECTS; HUMAN FACTORS; LIFE CYCLE; NITROGEN; NORTHERN HEMISPHERE; OXIDATION; PH VALUE; PHOTOSYNTHESIS; POLLUTANTS; REDOX REACTIONS; RESPIRATION; STOICHIOMETRY; SULFUR; SULFUR DIOXIDE; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHEMISTRY; EARTH PLANET; ECOSYSTEMS; ELEMENTS; HYDRIDES; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN HYDRIDES; NONMETALS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHOTOCHEMICAL REACTIONS; PLANETS; POLLUTION; POWER PLANTS; RAIN; SORPTION; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; SYNTHESIS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; WATER CHEMISTRY; 500200* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 510200 - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 520200 - Environment, Aquatic- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
6607649
Research Organizations:
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
Country of Origin:
United States
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ESTHA
Submitting Site:
CLA
Size:
Pages: 8-13
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Stumm, W, Sigg, L, and Schnoor, J L. Aquatic chemistry of acid deposition. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.1021/es00155a001.
Stumm, W, Sigg, L, & Schnoor, J L. Aquatic chemistry of acid deposition. United States. doi:10.1021/es00155a001.
Stumm, W, Sigg, L, and Schnoor, J L. 1987. "Aquatic chemistry of acid deposition." United States. doi:10.1021/es00155a001. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1021/es00155a001.
@misc{etde_6607649,
title = {Aquatic chemistry of acid deposition}
author = {Stumm, W, Sigg, L, and Schnoor, J L}
abstractNote = {The occurrence of acid precipitation in many regions of the Northern hemisphere is a consequnece of human interference in the cycles that unite land, water and atmosphere. The oxidation of carbon, sulfur and nitrogen, resulting mostly from fossil fuel burning, rivals oxidation processes induced by photosynthesis and respiration and disturbs redox conditions in the atmosphere. The paper discusses oxidation-reduction reactions, particularly those involving atmospheric pollutants that are important in the formation of acid precipitation. Topics covered are: a stoichiometric model of acid rain formation; sulfur dioxide and ammonia adsorption; acid neutralizing capacity. The paper concludes that explanations of simple chemical equilibria between gases and water aid our understanding of how acidifying gases become dissolved in cloud water, in droplets of falling rain, or in fog. Rigorous definitions of base- or acid-neutralizing capacities are prerequisites to measuring and interpreting residual acidity in dry and wet deposition and for assessing the disturbance caused by the transfer of acid to terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. 20 references.}
doi = {10.1021/es00155a001}
journal = {Environ. Sci. Technol.; (United States)}
volume = {21:1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United States}
year = {1987}
month = {Jan}
}