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A clinical study on the usefulness of CT and MRI imaging in evaluating differential diagnosis and the degree of dementia in vascular dementia

Journal Article:

Abstract

In a retrospective review of 117 computed tomography (CT) scans and 56 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans sequentially performed for dementia patients, CT and MRI were compared for assessment of the usefulness in the differential diagnosis and determination of the functional prognosis of vascular dementia. The correlation between CT findings and the degree of mental function was also examined. Since MRI had a higher sensitivity than CT in detecting small infarcts or lacunaes in the perforating area or white matter, it should differentiate vascular dementia from dementia of Alzheimer type. When both dementia of Alzheimer type was clinically diagnosed and infarct areas were detected on either CT or MRI, activity of daily living tended to be poor. Even when mixed type of dementia or vascular dementia was clinically diagnosed in spite of negative findings on either CT or MRI, troublesome behavior was frequently observed, posing the likelihood of dementia of Alzheimer type. The ability of CT and MRI to detect lesions was not correlated with the degree of dementia or aging, even if MRI was capable of detecting smaller lesions. CT was thus considered to be more specific modality for evaluating mental function. The size of lesions on CT was  More>>
Authors:
Hagiwara, Mariko [1] 
  1. Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)
Publication Date:
Jun 01, 1990
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
JPN-90-008405; EDB-90-148951
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nippon Ika Daigaku Zasshi (Journal of the Nippon Medical School); (Japan); Journal Volume: 57:3
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CEREBRUM; CAT SCANNING; NMR IMAGING; BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; MENTAL DISORDERS; SIZE; VASCULAR DISEASES; BODY; BRAIN; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DISEASES; FUNCTIONS; NERVOUS SYSTEM; ORGANS; TOMOGRAPHY; 550602* - Medicine- External Radiation in Diagnostics- (1980-)
OSTI ID:
6601014
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
Japanese
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0048-0444; CODEN: NIDZA
Submitting Site:
JPN
Size:
Pages: 265-275
Announcement Date:
Oct 15, 1990

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Hagiwara, Mariko. A clinical study on the usefulness of CT and MRI imaging in evaluating differential diagnosis and the degree of dementia in vascular dementia. Japan: N. p., 1990. Web.
Hagiwara, Mariko. A clinical study on the usefulness of CT and MRI imaging in evaluating differential diagnosis and the degree of dementia in vascular dementia. Japan.
Hagiwara, Mariko. 1990. "A clinical study on the usefulness of CT and MRI imaging in evaluating differential diagnosis and the degree of dementia in vascular dementia." Japan.
@misc{etde_6601014,
title = {A clinical study on the usefulness of CT and MRI imaging in evaluating differential diagnosis and the degree of dementia in vascular dementia}
author = {Hagiwara, Mariko}
abstractNote = {In a retrospective review of 117 computed tomography (CT) scans and 56 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans sequentially performed for dementia patients, CT and MRI were compared for assessment of the usefulness in the differential diagnosis and determination of the functional prognosis of vascular dementia. The correlation between CT findings and the degree of mental function was also examined. Since MRI had a higher sensitivity than CT in detecting small infarcts or lacunaes in the perforating area or white matter, it should differentiate vascular dementia from dementia of Alzheimer type. When both dementia of Alzheimer type was clinically diagnosed and infarct areas were detected on either CT or MRI, activity of daily living tended to be poor. Even when mixed type of dementia or vascular dementia was clinically diagnosed in spite of negative findings on either CT or MRI, troublesome behavior was frequently observed, posing the likelihood of dementia of Alzheimer type. The ability of CT and MRI to detect lesions was not correlated with the degree of dementia or aging, even if MRI was capable of detecting smaller lesions. CT was thus considered to be more specific modality for evaluating mental function. The size of lesions on CT was found to be more significant than the number and localization of lesions in determining the degree of dementia in the chronic stage of cerebrovascular disease. The ability of MRI to detect smaller lesions, as well as clinically determined ischemic scores, may assist in the diagnostic differentiation. Lesion size on CT may be an important factor for determining the degree of dementia and functional prognosis. (N.K.).}
journal = {Nippon Ika Daigaku Zasshi (Journal of the Nippon Medical School); (Japan)}
volume = {57:3}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Japan}
year = {1990}
month = {Jun}
}