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Influence of animal age upon antioxidant-modified UV carcinogenesis

Journal Article:

Abstract

Studies were undertaken to examine the effects of animal age on the anticarcinogenic properties of antioxidants. Female hairless mice, 2.5, 4.5 and 9.5 months of age, were subjected to daily irradiation from Westinghouse BZS-WLG lamps for 19 weeks. Experimental groups of animals were maintained on a commercial rodent meal supplemented with a 2% (w/w) antioxidant mixture. Control groups received only the meal. Tumour latency, expressed as median time to tumor development, was significantly greater for all age groups receiving antioxidants than for their similarly aged controls. However, the response to antioxidants appeared to decrease with age and the antioxidant effect was significantly less in the 9.5 month-old group than in the 2.5 month-old group. Likewise, the two youngest groups receiving antioxidants demonstrated a significantly fewer number of tumors per animal. It is concluded that animal age influences the degree of photoprotection provided by antioxidants. Whether this effect is related to dietary intake, and thus dependent upon resident antioxidant levels, is unknown. Nevertheless, dietary antioxidants provide significant protection in young animals against carcinogenesis induced by radiation of predominantly UVB wavelengths.
Authors:
Black, H S; [1]  McCann, V; [2]  Thornby, J I [3] 
  1. Photobiology Laboratory, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Houston, TX (USA)
  2. Baylor Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Coll. of Medicine
  3. Biostatistics Section, Research Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Houston, TX (USA)
Publication Date:
Aug 01, 1982
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
AIX-14-717278; EDB-83-036787
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Photobiochem. Photobiophys.; (Netherlands); Journal Volume: 4:1-2
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ANTIOXIDANTS; RADIOSENSITIVITY EFFECTS; CARCINOGENESIS; AGE DEPENDENCE; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; AGE GROUPS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; LIVER; MICE; ORAL ADMINISTRATION; RESPONSE MODIFYING FACTORS; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BODY; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; GLANDS; MAMMALS; ORGANS; PATHOGENESIS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; RODENTS; VERTEBRATES; 560152* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Animals
OSTI ID:
6579571
Country of Origin:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: PHOPD
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 107-118
Announcement Date:
Jan 01, 1983

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Black, H S, McCann, V, and Thornby, J I. Influence of animal age upon antioxidant-modified UV carcinogenesis. Netherlands: N. p., 1982. Web.
Black, H S, McCann, V, & Thornby, J I. Influence of animal age upon antioxidant-modified UV carcinogenesis. Netherlands.
Black, H S, McCann, V, and Thornby, J I. 1982. "Influence of animal age upon antioxidant-modified UV carcinogenesis." Netherlands.
@misc{etde_6579571,
title = {Influence of animal age upon antioxidant-modified UV carcinogenesis}
author = {Black, H S, McCann, V, and Thornby, J I}
abstractNote = {Studies were undertaken to examine the effects of animal age on the anticarcinogenic properties of antioxidants. Female hairless mice, 2.5, 4.5 and 9.5 months of age, were subjected to daily irradiation from Westinghouse BZS-WLG lamps for 19 weeks. Experimental groups of animals were maintained on a commercial rodent meal supplemented with a 2% (w/w) antioxidant mixture. Control groups received only the meal. Tumour latency, expressed as median time to tumor development, was significantly greater for all age groups receiving antioxidants than for their similarly aged controls. However, the response to antioxidants appeared to decrease with age and the antioxidant effect was significantly less in the 9.5 month-old group than in the 2.5 month-old group. Likewise, the two youngest groups receiving antioxidants demonstrated a significantly fewer number of tumors per animal. It is concluded that animal age influences the degree of photoprotection provided by antioxidants. Whether this effect is related to dietary intake, and thus dependent upon resident antioxidant levels, is unknown. Nevertheless, dietary antioxidants provide significant protection in young animals against carcinogenesis induced by radiation of predominantly UVB wavelengths.}
journal = {Photobiochem. Photobiophys.; (Netherlands)}
volume = {4:1-2}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Netherlands}
year = {1982}
month = {Aug}
}