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Health aspects of air pollution in Dublin

Journal Article:

Abstract

A study of the relationship between air pollution and specific health indicators in Dublin from 1970 to 1973 was undertaken using partial correlation analysis. Smoke and sulfur dioxide, accepted as indicators of general pollution conditions, were measured in the study. The indicators of health were deaths and hospital admissions of elderly and chronically ill people due to cardiovascular and respiratory illness, other than influenza and tonsillitis. Because temperature is also known to affect cardiovascular and respiratory illness, maximum daily temperature was chosen as the controlled weather variable. Mortality for cardiovascular disease was significantly correlated with SO/sub 2/ levels within the same 24 hr. Ischemic heart disease was the major component of this correlation. There is a progressive positive correlation at increasing threshold levels. These correlations were not sustained with a lag period of two days nor in relation to smoke indicators at any lag period or threshold level. Mortality for respiratory disease was less consistently associated with air pollution than cardiovascular disease. Levels of SO/sub 2/ up to 75 micrograms/cu m did not produce any significant response in terms of mortality. From 100 micrograms/cu m upwards there is a strong correlation with details from acute respiratory disease, principally acute bronchitis.  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1975
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-79-014543
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Irish J. Med. Sci.; (Ireland); Journal Volume: 144:3
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; AIR POLLUTION; HEALTH HAZARDS; BRONCHITIS; CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES; CORRELATIONS; HOSPITALS; IRELAND; ISCHEMIA; MAN; MORTALITY; PUBLIC HEALTH; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM DISEASES; SMOKES; STATISTICS; SULFUR DIOXIDE; TEMPERATURE MONITORING; WEATHER; AEROSOLS; ANEMIAS; ANIMALS; BUILDINGS; CHALCOGENIDES; COLLOIDS; DISEASES; DISPERSIONS; EUROPE; HAZARDS; HEMIC DISEASES; MAMMALS; MATHEMATICS; MEDICAL CENTERS; MONITORING; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; PRIMATES; RESIDUES; SOLS; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; SYMPTOMS; VERTEBRATES; 552000* - Public Health; 550900 - Pathology; 560306 - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
6572715
Country of Origin:
Ireland
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: IJMSA
Submitting Site:
APA
Size:
Pages: 102-115
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Kevany, J, Rooney, M, and Kennedy, J. Health aspects of air pollution in Dublin. Ireland: N. p., 1975. Web.
Kevany, J, Rooney, M, & Kennedy, J. Health aspects of air pollution in Dublin. Ireland.
Kevany, J, Rooney, M, and Kennedy, J. 1975. "Health aspects of air pollution in Dublin." Ireland.
@misc{etde_6572715,
title = {Health aspects of air pollution in Dublin}
author = {Kevany, J, Rooney, M, and Kennedy, J}
abstractNote = {A study of the relationship between air pollution and specific health indicators in Dublin from 1970 to 1973 was undertaken using partial correlation analysis. Smoke and sulfur dioxide, accepted as indicators of general pollution conditions, were measured in the study. The indicators of health were deaths and hospital admissions of elderly and chronically ill people due to cardiovascular and respiratory illness, other than influenza and tonsillitis. Because temperature is also known to affect cardiovascular and respiratory illness, maximum daily temperature was chosen as the controlled weather variable. Mortality for cardiovascular disease was significantly correlated with SO/sub 2/ levels within the same 24 hr. Ischemic heart disease was the major component of this correlation. There is a progressive positive correlation at increasing threshold levels. These correlations were not sustained with a lag period of two days nor in relation to smoke indicators at any lag period or threshold level. Mortality for respiratory disease was less consistently associated with air pollution than cardiovascular disease. Levels of SO/sub 2/ up to 75 micrograms/cu m did not produce any significant response in terms of mortality. From 100 micrograms/cu m upwards there is a strong correlation with details from acute respiratory disease, principally acute bronchitis. At 150 micrograms/cu m threshold there is also a strong correlation with deaths from chronic bronchitis, emphysema and asthma. No significant correlations existed for smoke at any threshold or lag period. Implications for community health are discussed.}
journal = {Irish J. Med. Sci.; (Ireland)}
volume = {144:3}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Ireland}
year = {1975}
month = {Jan}
}