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Biodegradability of northern crude oil

Technical Report:

Abstract

Field studies on the microbiological degradation of crude oils encompassed the placing of oil-soaked plots in two areas in the Northwest Territories and Alberta. Replicate plots received amendments of fertilizer, oil-utilizing bacteria, fertilizer plus bacteria or were untreated except for the oil. Changes in microbial numbers and chemical composition of recovered oil were determined periodically. The initial stimulatory effect on bacterial numbers brought about by the addition of fertilizers to oil-soaked plots diminished two years after the application to a point where the differences were no longer significant. Experiments carried out in the Norman Wells area to determine the effect of the amount of fertilizer applied on oil degradation have yielded inconclusive results. The data suggest that at least 2.7 kg of urea-phosphate fertilizer per kl of oil is required to maintain a reasonable oil degradation rate. Preliminary studies on the use of fertilizer coated with chemicals to increase its hydrophobic character indicate that they could be useful in treating wet-land oil spills. Soils from the McKenzie River drainage basin indicate that bacteria are present which can use oil under mesophilic conditions. However, the ability to use the same oil under psychrophilic conditions is more restricted. At least one bacterial  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1976
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
INA-ALUR75-76-81; CE-02333
Reference Number:
CANM-89-000587; ERA-14-019252; EDB-89-045433
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; OIL SPILLS; BIODEGRADATION; PETROLEUM; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; ALBERTA; ARCTIC REGIONS; BACTERIA; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; FERTILIZATION; FIELD TESTS; NORTHWEST TERRITORIES; SOILS; TIME DEPENDENCE; CANADA; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DECOMPOSITION; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; MICROORGANISMS; NORTH AMERICA; POLAR REGIONS; TESTING; 020900* - Petroleum- Environmental Aspects; 023000 - Petroleum- Properties & Composition; 510200 - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
6532499
Research Organizations:
Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Availability:
CANMET/TID, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, 555 Booth St., Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1A 0G1; $0.34CAN per page, $3.40 CAN minimum.
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
Pages: 65
Announcement Date:

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Cook, F D, and Westlake, D W.S. Biodegradability of northern crude oil. Canada: N. p., 1976. Web.
Cook, F D, & Westlake, D W.S. Biodegradability of northern crude oil. Canada.
Cook, F D, and Westlake, D W.S. 1976. "Biodegradability of northern crude oil." Canada.
@misc{etde_6532499,
title = {Biodegradability of northern crude oil}
author = {Cook, F D, and Westlake, D W.S.}
abstractNote = {Field studies on the microbiological degradation of crude oils encompassed the placing of oil-soaked plots in two areas in the Northwest Territories and Alberta. Replicate plots received amendments of fertilizer, oil-utilizing bacteria, fertilizer plus bacteria or were untreated except for the oil. Changes in microbial numbers and chemical composition of recovered oil were determined periodically. The initial stimulatory effect on bacterial numbers brought about by the addition of fertilizers to oil-soaked plots diminished two years after the application to a point where the differences were no longer significant. Experiments carried out in the Norman Wells area to determine the effect of the amount of fertilizer applied on oil degradation have yielded inconclusive results. The data suggest that at least 2.7 kg of urea-phosphate fertilizer per kl of oil is required to maintain a reasonable oil degradation rate. Preliminary studies on the use of fertilizer coated with chemicals to increase its hydrophobic character indicate that they could be useful in treating wet-land oil spills. Soils from the McKenzie River drainage basin indicate that bacteria are present which can use oil under mesophilic conditions. However, the ability to use the same oil under psychrophilic conditions is more restricted. At least one bacterial species from each mixed population studied was capable of bringing about chemical changes in oil similar to those observed for the original mixed culture. The potential hazards and uses of the seeding of oil spills is discussed relative to the environmental conditions found in the northern part of Canada. 35 refs., 2 figs., 15 tabs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1976}
month = {Jan}
}