You need JavaScript to view this

Environmental aspects of large-scale wind-power systems in the UK

Journal Article:

Abstract

Environmental issues relating to the introduction of large, MW-scale wind turbines at land-based sites in the U.K. are discussed. Areas of interest include noise, television interference, hazards to bird life and visual effects. A number of areas of uncertainty are identified, but enough is known from experience elsewhere in the world to enable the first U.K. machines to be introduced in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner. Research currently under way will serve to establish siting criteria more clearly, and could significantly increase the potential wind-energy resource. Certain studies of the comparative risk of energy systems are shown to be overpessimistic for U.K. wind turbines.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1983
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-84-165267
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: IEE Proc., Part A; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 130
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; WIND TURBINES; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; BIRDS; NOISE POLLUTION; UNITED KINGDOM; ANIMALS; EUROPE; MACHINERY; POLLUTION; TURBINES; TURBOMACHINERY; VERTEBRATES; WESTERN EUROPE; 170500* - Wind Energy- Environmental Aspects
OSTI ID:
6507223
Research Organizations:
Central Electricity Generating Board, London, England
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: IPPRD
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 620-625
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Robson, A. Environmental aspects of large-scale wind-power systems in the UK. United Kingdom: N. p., 1983. Web.
Robson, A. Environmental aspects of large-scale wind-power systems in the UK. United Kingdom.
Robson, A. 1983. "Environmental aspects of large-scale wind-power systems in the UK." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_6507223,
title = {Environmental aspects of large-scale wind-power systems in the UK}
author = {Robson, A}
abstractNote = {Environmental issues relating to the introduction of large, MW-scale wind turbines at land-based sites in the U.K. are discussed. Areas of interest include noise, television interference, hazards to bird life and visual effects. A number of areas of uncertainty are identified, but enough is known from experience elsewhere in the world to enable the first U.K. machines to be introduced in a safe and environmentally acceptable manner. Research currently under way will serve to establish siting criteria more clearly, and could significantly increase the potential wind-energy resource. Certain studies of the comparative risk of energy systems are shown to be overpessimistic for U.K. wind turbines.}
journal = {IEE Proc., Part A; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {130}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1983}
month = {Dec}
}