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Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces

Conference:

Abstract

The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Feb 01, 1983
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-830193-
Reference Number:
AIX-16-079021; EDB-86-017685
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Rev. Bras. Fis.; (Brazil); Journal Volume: Especial; Conference: 1. Brazilian school on semiconductor physics, Campinas, Brazil, 31 Jan 1983
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE; HETEROJUNCTIONS; INTEGRATED CIRCUITS; INTERFACES; MAGNETIC PROPERTIES; OPTICAL PROPERTIES; OXIDATION; SOLAR CELLS; SUPERLATTICES; SURFACES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; DIRECT ENERGY CONVERTERS; ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; EQUIPMENT; JUNCTIONS; MATERIALS; MICROELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; PHOTOELECTRIC CELLS; PHOTOVOLTAIC CELLS; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTIONS; SOLAR EQUIPMENT; 360603* - Materials- Properties
OSTI ID:
6464670
Research Organizations:
IBM Research Div., San Jose, CA, USA
Country of Origin:
Brazil
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: RBFSA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 335-342
Announcement Date:

Conference:

Citation Formats

Herman, F. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces. Brazil: N. p., 1983. Web.
Herman, F. Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces. Brazil.
Herman, F. 1983. "Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces." Brazil.
@misc{etde_6464670,
title = {Electronic structure of semiconductor interfaces}
author = {Herman, F}
abstractNote = {The study of semiconductor interfaces is one of the most active and exciting areas of current semiconductor research. Because interfaces play a vital role in modern semiconductor technology (integrated circuits, heterojunction lasers, solar cells, infrared detectors, etc.), there is a strong incentive to understand interface properties at a fundamental level and advance existing technology thereby. At the same time, technological advances such as molecular beam epitaxy have paved the way for the fabrication of semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices of novel design which exhibit unusual electronic, optical, and magnetic properties and offer unique opportunities for fundamental scientific research. A general perspective on this subject is offered treating such topics as the atomic and electronic structure of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces; oxidation and oxide layers; semiconductor heterojunctions and superlattices; rectifying metal-semiconductor contacts; and interface reactions. Recent progress is emphasized and some future directions are indicated. In addition, the role that large-scale scientific computation has played in furthering our theoretical understanding of semiconductor surfaces and interfaces is discussed. Finally, the nature of theoretical models, and the role they play in describing the physical world is considered.}
journal = {Rev. Bras. Fis.; (Brazil)}
volume = {Especial}
place = {Brazil}
year = {1983}
month = {Feb}
}