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Dietary zinc and its toxicity

Journal Article:

Abstract

First signs of Zn-toxicity in rats appeared at 1000 to 2000 ppm Zn in food. They were characterized by growth inhibition by the appearance of a microcytic hypochromic anemia by a reversible impairment of the ability to reproduce by disturbances in fat metabolism and by Zn-accumulation especially in the liver and the skeleton. Available results in the literature concerning alimentary Zn-toxicity in horses are few. At a daily doses of 8000 mg Zn during gestation there were no noticeable adverse effects either in the mare or the foal. While with young lambs addition of Zn of up to 1000 ppm enhanced growth, food intake and feed efficiency, with older lambs it gave rise to depressions. Available results of experiments with milk cows are equally insufficient. At Zn-concentration of 40 to 80 ppm, which may be reached in normal foodstuff, there appears to be a disturbance in the metabolism of cellulose in the rumen. In spite of this fact and notwithstanding the insufficiently examined influence of high Zn-concentrations in food on the Cu-metabolism, the limit of Zn-tolerance can be given at 1000 mg per kg of food. If dissolved, Zn is far more toxic. With calves there wre no signs of  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1973
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-85-007325
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Uebers. Tierernaehr.; (Germany, Federal Republic of); Journal Volume: 1:1
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ZINC; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COWS; HORSES; RATS; SHEEP; SWINE; TOXICITY; ANIMALS; CATTLE; DOMESTIC ANIMALS; ELEMENTS; MAMMALS; METALS; RODENTS; RUMINANTS; VERTEBRATES; 560305* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Vertebrates- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
6437885
Research Organizations:
Universitaet Hohenheim, Stuttgart, West Germany
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
German
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: UETID
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 57-58
Announcement Date:
Oct 01, 1984

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Lantzsch, H J. Dietary zinc and its toxicity. Germany: N. p., 1973. Web.
Lantzsch, H J. Dietary zinc and its toxicity. Germany.
Lantzsch, H J. 1973. "Dietary zinc and its toxicity." Germany.
@misc{etde_6437885,
title = {Dietary zinc and its toxicity}
author = {Lantzsch, H J}
abstractNote = {First signs of Zn-toxicity in rats appeared at 1000 to 2000 ppm Zn in food. They were characterized by growth inhibition by the appearance of a microcytic hypochromic anemia by a reversible impairment of the ability to reproduce by disturbances in fat metabolism and by Zn-accumulation especially in the liver and the skeleton. Available results in the literature concerning alimentary Zn-toxicity in horses are few. At a daily doses of 8000 mg Zn during gestation there were no noticeable adverse effects either in the mare or the foal. While with young lambs addition of Zn of up to 1000 ppm enhanced growth, food intake and feed efficiency, with older lambs it gave rise to depressions. Available results of experiments with milk cows are equally insufficient. At Zn-concentration of 40 to 80 ppm, which may be reached in normal foodstuff, there appears to be a disturbance in the metabolism of cellulose in the rumen. In spite of this fact and notwithstanding the insufficiently examined influence of high Zn-concentrations in food on the Cu-metabolism, the limit of Zn-tolerance can be given at 1000 mg per kg of food. If dissolved, Zn is far more toxic. With calves there wre no signs of clinical toxicity up to Zn-concentrations in the food of 3000 ppm. Above 900 ppm there appeared depression in growth and deterioration in the feed efficiency. Ae 1700 ppm there was a decrease infood intake. Increased Zn-intake lead to a growing Zn-accumulation in several organs and tissues, with the accumulation in the liver, bones, kidneys, pancreas and the gastrointestinal tract being of special significance. With cessation of Zn-intake in food, Zn-accumulation slowly disappeared. As a result of high Zn-intake there appears to be synergistic and antagonistic interdependent effects with the metabolism of other trace elements (Cu, Fe) and minerals (Ca, Na, P).}
journal = {Uebers. Tierernaehr.; (Germany, Federal Republic of)}
volume = {1:1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Germany}
year = {1973}
month = {Jan}
}