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Do nations still need national energy policies

Journal Article:

Abstract

Once again the issue has arisen whether a national energy policy is necessary or even desirable. No doubt renewed debate has been stimulated by recent developments - the collapse of the Soviet threat, an altered perception of the power of OPEC, or a jaundiced view regarding the effectiveness of governments in this arena. Yet, beneath the surface lie longer-standing issues regarding interests and ideology. This article attempts to deal with the issue, first, as a generic level, then in terms of the transformed energy market, and, finally, in relation to the content of energy policy. (author)
Authors:
Schlesinger, James; [1]  Odell, P; [2]  Jones, D
  1. Lehman Brothers, Washington, DC (United States)
  2. Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands). Dept. of International Energy Studies
Publication Date:
Feb 01, 1993
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
GB-93-050739; EDB-93-089859
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Oxford Energy Forum; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 12
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ENERGY POLICY; GLOBAL ASPECTS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; 290000* - Energy Planning & Policy
OSTI ID:
6409761
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0959-7727; CODEN: OENFEU
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
Pages: 3-7
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Schlesinger, James, Odell, P, and Jones, D. Do nations still need national energy policies. United Kingdom: N. p., 1993. Web.
Schlesinger, James, Odell, P, & Jones, D. Do nations still need national energy policies. United Kingdom.
Schlesinger, James, Odell, P, and Jones, D. 1993. "Do nations still need national energy policies." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_6409761,
title = {Do nations still need national energy policies}
author = {Schlesinger, James, Odell, P, and Jones, D}
abstractNote = {Once again the issue has arisen whether a national energy policy is necessary or even desirable. No doubt renewed debate has been stimulated by recent developments - the collapse of the Soviet threat, an altered perception of the power of OPEC, or a jaundiced view regarding the effectiveness of governments in this arena. Yet, beneath the surface lie longer-standing issues regarding interests and ideology. This article attempts to deal with the issue, first, as a generic level, then in terms of the transformed energy market, and, finally, in relation to the content of energy policy. (author)}
journal = {Oxford Energy Forum; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {12}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1993}
month = {Feb}
}