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Special problems of setting up nuclear medicine in a developing country

Abstract

There are some special problems in setting up nuclear medicine in a developing country. They can be briefly described in the form of the following general rules. 1) Impossible triangle. For the practice of nuclear medicine, three things are needed: Instrument, Radiopharmaceutical and a Patient. In a developing country, these three become three sides of an impossible triangle. When the radiopharmaceutical is available, the instrument may not be working; when the instrument is functioning, the radiopharmaceutical may not have been obtained from the foreign supplier; and when both are there, the patient might no longer be in the hospital. Three sides of this triangle never join to become a congruent whole. 2) Reverse square law. Further away one is from the source of supply of instruments and radiopharmaceuticals, the problems multiply by the square of this distance. 3) Future of nuclear medicine is tied to the electrical supply available in a developing country. These problems related to power supply are described in the Chapter on maintenance of instruments
Authors:
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1992
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
NMS-1
Reference Number:
SCA: 550600; PA: AIX-29:049629; EDB-98:095775; SN: 98002003665
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: 1 tab; PBD: 1992; Related Information: Is Part Of Handbook of nuclear medicine practice in developing countries; PB: 728 p.
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; BIOMEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY; COST; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; LABORATORY EQUIPMENT; MEDICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; MEDICAL PERSONNEL; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; PLANNING; RADIATION PROTECTION; RADIOLOGICAL PERSONNEL; RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS; RECOMMENDATIONS
OSTI ID:
640617
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Nuclear Medicine Section
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE98635463; TRN: XA9847631049629
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE98635463
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 665-671
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Ganatra, R D. Special problems of setting up nuclear medicine in a developing country. IAEA: N. p., 1992. Web.
Ganatra, R D. Special problems of setting up nuclear medicine in a developing country. IAEA.
Ganatra, R D. 1992. "Special problems of setting up nuclear medicine in a developing country." IAEA.
@misc{etde_640617,
title = {Special problems of setting up nuclear medicine in a developing country}
author = {Ganatra, R D}
abstractNote = {There are some special problems in setting up nuclear medicine in a developing country. They can be briefly described in the form of the following general rules. 1) Impossible triangle. For the practice of nuclear medicine, three things are needed: Instrument, Radiopharmaceutical and a Patient. In a developing country, these three become three sides of an impossible triangle. When the radiopharmaceutical is available, the instrument may not be working; when the instrument is functioning, the radiopharmaceutical may not have been obtained from the foreign supplier; and when both are there, the patient might no longer be in the hospital. Three sides of this triangle never join to become a congruent whole. 2) Reverse square law. Further away one is from the source of supply of instruments and radiopharmaceuticals, the problems multiply by the square of this distance. 3) Future of nuclear medicine is tied to the electrical supply available in a developing country. These problems related to power supply are described in the Chapter on maintenance of instruments}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1992}
month = {Dec}
}