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Radioimmunoassay in developing countries: General principles

Abstract

Radioimmunoassay (RIA) is probably the most commonly performed nuclear medicine technique. It is an in vitro procedure, where no radioactivity is administered to the patient. But this alone is not the reason for its widespread use. It provides the basis for extremely sensitive and specific diagnostic tests, and its use in present day medicine has brought a virtual information explosion in terms of understanding the pathophysiology of many diseases. The fact that the technology involved is within the technical and economic capabilities of the developing world is evident from the increasing demand for its introduction or expansion of existing services. RIA facilities need not be restricted to urban hospitals, as in the case of in vivo nuclear medicine techniques, but may be extended to smaller district hospitals and other laboratories in peripheral areas. It is also possible to send blood samples to a central laboratory so that a single centre can serve a wide geographical area. There are many laboratories in the industrialized world that receive a major proportion of samples for assay by mail. In recent years, substantial RIA services have been established in many of the developing countries in Asia and Latin America. The International Atomic Energy Agency  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1992
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
NMS-1
Reference Number:
SCA: 550601; 400703; PA: AIX-29:049611; EDB-98:095832; SN: 98002003647
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: 12 figs; PBD: 1992; Related Information: Is Part Of Handbook of nuclear medicine practice in developing countries; PB: 728 p.
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; 40 CHEMISTRY; COORDINATED RESEARCH PROGRAMS; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DIAGNOSTIC USES; IAEA; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; QUALITY CONTROL; RADIOIMMUNOASSAY; REAGENTS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; WHO
OSTI ID:
640599
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Nuclear Medicine Section
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE98635463; TRN: XA9847613049611
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE98635463
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 191-260
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Piyasena, R D. Radioimmunoassay in developing countries: General principles. IAEA: N. p., 1992. Web.
Piyasena, R D. Radioimmunoassay in developing countries: General principles. IAEA.
Piyasena, R D. 1992. "Radioimmunoassay in developing countries: General principles." IAEA.
@misc{etde_640599,
title = {Radioimmunoassay in developing countries: General principles}
author = {Piyasena, R D}
abstractNote = {Radioimmunoassay (RIA) is probably the most commonly performed nuclear medicine technique. It is an in vitro procedure, where no radioactivity is administered to the patient. But this alone is not the reason for its widespread use. It provides the basis for extremely sensitive and specific diagnostic tests, and its use in present day medicine has brought a virtual information explosion in terms of understanding the pathophysiology of many diseases. The fact that the technology involved is within the technical and economic capabilities of the developing world is evident from the increasing demand for its introduction or expansion of existing services. RIA facilities need not be restricted to urban hospitals, as in the case of in vivo nuclear medicine techniques, but may be extended to smaller district hospitals and other laboratories in peripheral areas. It is also possible to send blood samples to a central laboratory so that a single centre can serve a wide geographical area. There are many laboratories in the industrialized world that receive a major proportion of samples for assay by mail. In recent years, substantial RIA services have been established in many of the developing countries in Asia and Latin America. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and World Health Organisation (WHO) have made vital contributions to these activities and have played a catalytic role in assisting member states to achieve realistic goals. In the past five years, more than 250 individual RIA laboratories in developing member states have been beneficiaries of IAEA projects}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1992}
month = {Dec}
}