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Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT)

Abstract

Tomography in nuclear medicine did not originate after the introduction of X-ray computerized tomography (CT). Even in the days of rectilinear scanner, tomography was attempted with multiple detector heads rotating around the patient, but the counts at each plane were never very high to obtain a satisfactory image. A high resolution focusing collimator can look at different depths but taking several slices in one projection was a time consuming process. Rectilinear scanners lose lot of counts in the collimator to look at one point, at on time, in one plane. It is true that attempts to do tomography with gamma camera really got a boost after the success of CT. By that time, algorithms for doing reconstruction of images also were highly refined and for advanced. Clinical application of SPECT has become widespread now, because of the development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals and improvement in instrumentation. The SPECT provides a direct measure of regional organ function and is performed with nuclides such as {sup 123}I and {sup 99}Tc{sup m} that emit a mono-image photon during their decay. SPECT is far less expensive than positron emission tomography
Authors:
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1992
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
NMS-1
Reference Number:
SCA: 440101; 550601; 550602; PA: AIX-29:049601; EDB-98:095205; SN: 98002003637
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 1992; Related Information: Is Part Of Handbook of nuclear medicine practice in developing countries; PB: 728 p.
Subject:
44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; 55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; ALGORITHMS; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DIAGNOSTIC USES; GAMMA CAMERAS; IMAGE PROCESSING; IMAGE SCANNERS; IMAGES; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; RESOLUTION; SINGLE PHOTON EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY
OSTI ID:
640589
Research Organizations:
International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Nuclear Medicine Section
Country of Origin:
IAEA
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE98635463; TRN: XA9847603049601
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE98635463
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
pp. 39-44
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Ganatra, R D. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). IAEA: N. p., 1992. Web.
Ganatra, R D. Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). IAEA.
Ganatra, R D. 1992. "Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT)." IAEA.
@misc{etde_640589,
title = {Single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT)}
author = {Ganatra, R D}
abstractNote = {Tomography in nuclear medicine did not originate after the introduction of X-ray computerized tomography (CT). Even in the days of rectilinear scanner, tomography was attempted with multiple detector heads rotating around the patient, but the counts at each plane were never very high to obtain a satisfactory image. A high resolution focusing collimator can look at different depths but taking several slices in one projection was a time consuming process. Rectilinear scanners lose lot of counts in the collimator to look at one point, at on time, in one plane. It is true that attempts to do tomography with gamma camera really got a boost after the success of CT. By that time, algorithms for doing reconstruction of images also were highly refined and for advanced. Clinical application of SPECT has become widespread now, because of the development of suitable radiopharmaceuticals and improvement in instrumentation. The SPECT provides a direct measure of regional organ function and is performed with nuclides such as {sup 123}I and {sup 99}Tc{sup m} that emit a mono-image photon during their decay. SPECT is far less expensive than positron emission tomography}
place = {IAEA}
year = {1992}
month = {Dec}
}